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first_imgSteven Pinker wants you to know that violence has declined.Despite civil wars in Africa and the Mideast, ongoing strife in Afghanistan, and the barrage of local and national crimes reported on the nightly news, people are living in a much more peaceful era than they might think.“During the thousands of years humans spent as hunter-gatherers, the average rate of violent death was higher than the worst years of World War II, and about five times higher than the rate of death from all wars, genocides, and human-made famines in the 20th century,” said Pinker, the Johnstone Family Professor of Psychology and Harvard College Professor.“Believe it or not … today we may be living in the most peaceable era in our species’ existence,” wrote Pinker in his latest book, “The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined,” which takes its title from that age-old dichotomy: the devil on one shoulder, whispering temptation, enticing us to act on sinister urges, and the angel on the other shoulder, holding us back with caution and consequence.“Human nature is extraordinarily complex, and includes both bellicose and peaceable motives. Outbreaks of violence or peace depend on which is more engaged in a given time and place,” said Pinker. “Among the better angels of our nature — the psychological faculties that caused violence to decline —  are self-control, empathy, and a sense of fairness.”But, Pinker added, “My most surprising discovery was that the most important better angel may be reason: the cognitive faculties with which we understand the physical and social world. It was an ironic discovery, given that cognition and language are my research specialty.”What historical forces have been engaging these better angels? Pinker cites “the outsourcing of deterrence and revenge to a disinterested third party, including the police and court system; the growth of commerce, which replaces zero-sum plunder with positive-sum trade and reciprocity; the forces of cosmopolitanism, such as mobility and literacy, which encourage people to take other vantage points and hence consider their interests; and the growth of education, public discourse, science, and abstract reasoning, which discourage parochial tribalism and encourage people to treat violence as a problem to be solved rather than as a contest to be won.”To put this all in context, Pinker shows that homicide rates in Europe have declined 30-fold since the Middle Ages. Human sacrifice, slavery, punitive torture, and mutilation have been abolished around the world. And, he said, “Great powers and developed countries have stopped going to war. And in the world as a whole, deaths in warfare may be at an all-time low.”In his research, Pinker’s favorite discovery was learning that “every category of violence — from deaths in war to the spanking of children to the number of motion pictures in which animals were harmed — had declined.” That, he admitted, “makes the present less sinister, the past less innocent.”He believes that “forms of institutionalized violence that can be eliminated by the stroke of a pen — such as capital punishment, the criminalization of homosexuality, the callous treatment of farm animals, and the corporal punishment of children in schools — will continue to decline, because decision-making elites will continue to be swept by the humanitarian tide that has carried them along for centuries.”Pinker is now working with graduate student Kyle Thomas on a new project, studying “common knowledge,” the state where two people not only know something important, but each knows that the other knows that he knows it, ad infinitum.“My next book project will be a style manual for the 21st century — a competitor to Strunk and White that will incorporate insights from modern linguistics and cognitive science,” he said.“But ‘Better Angels’ made me appreciate the forces of civilization and enlightenment which have made our lives so much more peaceable than those of our ancestors: the police, a court system, democracy, education, literacy, commerce, science, the Enlightenment, and the forms of secular humanism that grew out of it — which are easy to take for granted.”last_img read more


first_imgAnd most importantly, congratulations to the MVRHS Class of 2020. We have enjoyed our time with you these past 4 years, we will miss you and we look forward to seeing the impact you make in our world.Sara Dingledy, PrincipalNoelle Warburton – Administrative AssistantAmy Lilavois – Class of 2020 AdvisorMatt Malowski – Class of 2020 Advisor To the Editor: The MVRHS Class of 2020 has graduated. On Sunday, July 26, 155 students walked across a stage and received their diplomas. Over 200 cars seated with family members watched on a giant LED screen while their graduates, wearing caps and gowns, sat in chairs placed 6 feet apart and family members near and far live-streamed the event. In the spring, an overwhelming majority of students had expressed their want for an in-person graduation. We weren’t sure it could happen but we were determined to try. After four months of monitoring the state’s shifting health and safety guidelines, an immense amount of anxiety and patience on the part of everyone involved, and an incredible community effort, we pulled it off. The graduating class and their families participated in a one of a kind, in-person, socially-distanced, memorable event that will not soon be forgotten.None of this would have been possible without the support and generosity of so many Island individuals and organizations. To the West Tisbury Select Board — thank you for approving this event without a blink of an eye; to Omar Johnson and the West Tisbury Board of Health and to the West Tisbury Police Department — we thank you for your guidance and patience with our planning; to Kristina West and Chris Lyons of the MV Agricultural Society — thank you for your flexibility and your guidance working with a group of educators who have never before parked cars or organized an event of this size; to the abutting neighbors of the Ag Hall — thank you for the permission to hold this event; MVTV — thank you for editing the video tribute, filming the event to be live streamed for those who couldn’t attend and for volunteering all of your time; to Charlie Esposito for his calming presence and his expertise in all areas technical; Maria Thibodeau, Chris Baer, and Kate Hennigan for capturing the moment on film and video; to MV United Soccer, Point B Realty, Amy Upton and Corona Stompers, MV Social Justice Leadership Foundation, MVCS, MV Youth Task Force, Johnny Cupcakes, Patti Leighton and MV Bank, the parents of the Class of 2020 and countless other generous individuals, thank you for donating time and money to support our students.last_img read more


first_imgIn this May 2, 1963, file photo, St. Louis Cardinals’ Stan Musial sits in the clubhouse after he tied Babe Ruth’s extra-base-hit record, against the Chicago Cubs in St. Louis. Fans of Cardinals great Stan Musial will get a chance to own a piece of his personal collection _ items ranging from game-worn jerseys to championship rings to harmonicas _ through an online auction that’s now under way. Musial died in January at age 92. (AP Photo/File)  by Jim SalterAssociated Press WriterST. LOUIS (AP) — Who wouldn’t love a baseball team from the quaint Heartland, the team that produced gentlemanly Stan Musial and fans so friendly they sometimes cheer opposing players?Apparently, a growing legion.As the World Series moves to St. Louis on Saturday, vast regions of the Midwest and South still love their Cardinals. But nationally, there are signs that Cardinals fatigue has set in.That’s not completely unexpected given the team’s recent omnipresence in the postseason. All the Haterade was probably inevitable with the emergence of snarky websites and social media — though Twitter co-founder and St. Louis native Jack Dorsey surely didn’t envision all the 140-words-or-less nastiness directed at his beloved team.It began in the first round of the playoffs with some national commentators openly rooting for the Pirates to beat St. Louis. It was more about Pittsburgh’s storybook emergence after a two-decade playoff drought than hate of the Cardinals, but it didn’t go unnoticed in Cardinals country.Then there are the online barbs. In a recent column on the website Deadspin, Drew Magary called St. Louis a “dump” and took particular exception to the team’s fervent fan base.“Wanna know who you really are, Cardinals fans?” Magary wrote. “You are this. You are poorly disguised Yankees fans in ugly Christmas sweaters carrying a Jell-O mold to your neighbor’s door.”Another website, Buzzfeed, ran a story headlined, “23 Reasons It’s Perfectly OK To Despise The St. Louis Cardinals.” Among the reasons: No. 20 — Yadier Molina’s neck tattoos.When their run of success began in 2000, the Cardinals were the happy story — red-clad fans with high school football-like enthusiasm for their overachieving Midwestern mid-market team.Since then, the Cardinals have become as common in October as falling leaves and pumpkins on the porch. Ten of the last 14 postseasons have included them. They’ve played in the National League championship series eight times in the span. This World Series appearance is their fourth since 2004.Some are literally tired of seeing red.“I think to a certain extent that part of the life story of being a sports fan is the struggle, the sense of grinding it out with your team. When your team is in the playoffs 10 of the last 14 years, that can come in conflict with people’s ideas of what a real fan is,” said Annemarie Farrell of Ithaca College, who has done research on the behavior of sports fans.Fans in St. Louis write off the criticism as jealousy.“Once you start winning the tide turns,” Cardinals season ticket holder Mark Shevitz, 58, said as he shopped in the team store at the ballpark. “Now everybody kind of wants to knock you off the pedestal. People are tired of seeing you win.”True enough. Any list of sports teams that draw the ire of fans of other teams is top-heavy with frequent winners — the Yankees, NBA’s Los Angeles Lakers, the NFL’s New England Patriots, even the Cardinals’ World Series opponents, the Red Sox.The disdain for the Cardinals has extended to some opponents. National League Central foes have for years felt the Cardinals sometimes came across as self-appointed proprietors of baseball’s unwritten rules on etiquette.After the NLCS, some Los Angeles Dodgers feel the same way. When Dodgers slugger Adrian Gonzalez was demonstrative after a key hit in Game 3, Cardinals pitcher Adam Wainwright called the behavior “Mickey Mouse.” Gonzalez responded later by feigning Mickey Mouse ears after another big hit.St. Louis Post-Dispatch columnist Bernie Miklasz found the derision ironic.“Cardinals and their fans were depicted as a stern colony of baseball Amish because they prefer solid fundamental play, gentlemanly superstars such as Stan Musial and success with reasonable dignity,” Miklasz wrote in a column after the Cardinals eliminated the Dodgers in Game 6.All is not negative for the Cardinals, who remain beloved at home, with a fan base that extends over several states. The team draws 3 million-plus fans to Busch Stadium every year and supporters often turn out in the thousands for road games.Meier Raivich of Fanatics, the largest online retailer of licensed team gear, said that during the regular season, Cardinals merchandise was the third-most popular among major league teams, topped only by the Yankees at No. 1 and the Red Sox.Farrell said the Cardinals and their fans shouldn’t make too much of the criticism.“The Cardinals are such an iconic baseball brand, and they’re also a team that’s hard to hate,” she said. “If you’re going to find a reason to root against them, maybe it’s because they’re always good.”last_img read more


first_imgSamuel Weber added an insurance marker for the Leafs, which evened the season series between the two teams at one game each.Colum Mcgauley and Chad Grambo scored seconds apart in the opening period as the teams sparred through the first period tied 1-1.Brendan Mckay, shorthanded, gave Nelson a brief 22-second lead as Trey Mason tied the game.David Lenzin put the home side ahead after 40 minutes before Dylan Haney tied the game for the third time during the final frame, scoring on the power play.Josh Bolding was solid between the pipes for Nelson, facing 22 shots while Anthony Galliart took the loss in goal for Grand Forks.Nelson returns to home ice Saturday against Spokane Braves while the Bruins hosts Kimberley Dynamiters in the Grand Forks Arena.BLUELIINES: Leafs added another player to the roster as 6’2″ 185-pound forward Mason Mullaney played for the first time against the Bruins. Mullaney, 18,  came to Nelson from the Saskatchewan Hockey League. . . . While most teams support Breast Cancer month by wearing pink skate laces or hockey tape, Grand Forks took it to another level by sporting pink jerseys and socks for Friday’s game. For almost 59 minutes Nelson Leafs and Grand Forks Border Bruins exchanged body blows in a Murdoch Division Showdown.With 1:03 remaining in the game, Andy Fitzpatrick nailed the Bruins with a knockout punch, scoring the winning goal in a 5-3 Kootenay International Junior Hockey League victory for the Green and White Friday at the NDCC Arena.The win pulls Nelson into a second-place tie in the Murdoch Division with the Bruins.Beaver Valley continues to hold a one-point lead over both Grand Forks and Nelson.last_img read more


first_imgTAOISEACH Enda Kenny has defended his Government’s decision to close down Anglo Irish Bank, saying a deal with Europe would help Ireland into the future.Under the plans the banking debts will become sovereign debts and be paid off by Irish taxpayers over the next 40 years through Government bonds.Mr Kenny however said the disappearance of Anglo Irish Bank and Irish Nationwide from the Irish financial landscape was “long overdue”. He said they had become emblems of cronyism in the country and “a dent in our national pride.”The suffering of the Irish people has been made much worse by the debt of the likes of Anglo Irish Bank, said Mr KennyHe pointed out that without banking costs, Ireland’s sovereign debt levels would now be below Germany’s.Enda Kenny said there was now an opportunity for the ECB to act to help Ireland’s economic recovery. He said the end of IBRC would mark the end of a dark chapter in Irish political history.Tánaiste and Labour leader Eamon Gilmore said the legislation will do what should have been done on the night of the bank guarantee.The Government believes that the deal will spread debts over a longer period of time, making budgets less harsh in the years ahead. DAIL DEBATE: TAOISEACH SAYS EUROBANK DEAL ENDS ‘DARK CHAPTER’ IN OUR HISTORY was last modified: February 7th, 2013 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:DAIL DEBATE: TAOISEACH SAYS EUROBANK DEAL ENDS ‘DARK CHAPTER’ IN OUR HISTORYlast_img read more


first_imgClannad’s lead vocalist Moya Brennan presents ‘Song of the Seven Sisters’, a gala celebration of female artists from Donegal and around the world.This unique event sees Moya Brennan, a true legend of Celtic music, bring together seven unmissable female artists in homage to Donegal’s inspiring western mountain range the “Seven Sisters”.This event forms a key part of the Earagail Arts Festival’s inaugural Donegal Folk and Roots Festival, a celebration of folk, roots and traditional music from around the world. Taking place in the Clanree Hotel, Letterkenny on Saturday, 11th July, ‘Song of The Seven Sisters’ is a not-to-be-missed night of musical entertainment.Accompanied by the three part harmonies of The Henry Girls, the choral presence of the Inishowen Gospel Choir, rising singer/songwriters Aisling Jarvis and Leila Keeney with American folk singer Twain, this unique concert will feature a very special guest, the Soul of Morocco, Sahrawi singer Oum and a performance by the Japanese Yushuro No Kai dance group.In her music making, Moya has never been content to nestle within comfortable boundaries. From an early age she trod the boards with her father Leo in the dance halls, then became fixated with the likes of Joni Mitchell and the Beach Boys before going on to share, with her band Clannad, an enlightening discovery of the extraordinary wealth of Celtic history and melody on her doorstep.Oum shines as a cultural ambassador of Morocco due to her personality, talent and commitment. Her intense voice and songs reflect her cultural heritage, spinning wonderful connections between soul, jazz, Gnawa rhythms, and the resonance of the Hassani dialect of her Western Sahara origins.‘Song of the Seven Sisters’ forms part of the inaugural Donegal Folk and Roots Festival, a weekend of music which features over 20 different concerts, masterclasses and traditional Irish music seisúns throughout Letterkenny.Another highlight of the weekend is ‘Altan Plus Special Guests’, which takes place in the Clanree Hotel, Letterkenny on Sunday, 12th July. Doors open 8pm and tickets cost €27.50. Earagail Arts Festival is currently offering tickets to both ‘Song of the Seven Sisters’ and ‘Altan Plus Special Guests’ for a combined rate of €40.00. Tickets for the full weekend of the Donegal Folk and Roots Festival are also available at a rate of €110 from www.eaf.ie.Early booking is advised and, this year, the Earagail Arts Festival has introduced free online booking. For full details on the Earagail Arts programme and bookings visit www.eaf.ie. Earagail Arts Festival is funded by The Arts Council of Ireland, Fáilte Ireland and Donegal County Council.MOYA BRENNAN A ‘MUST’ AT EARAGAIL ARTS FESTIVAL WITH ‘SONGS OF THE SEVEN SISTERS’ was last modified: June 24th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Earagail Arts FestivalMoya BrennanVClannadlast_img read more


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Population trends project the world population will grow by two billion in the next 40 years, requiring a 70% increase in food production to feed the world. To meet this demand, the future generation of farmers, scientists and other professionals will need to be Ag innovators. That’s where the 4‑H Ag Innovators Experience comes in.The 2017 4‑H Ag Innovators Experience is the Healthy Soils Carbon Soil Investigation Challenge which teaches 4-H youth about the importance of preserving and improving soil health through a variety of different methods to help create a sustainable ecosystem responsible for our food and fiber needs, environmental quality, and human health.This is the fourth year National 4-H Council has collaborated with Monsanto on the 4-H Ag Innovators program which engages youth in five states to build awareness of, and interest in, agriculture innovation and careers. This year’s Healthy Soils Carbon Soil Investigation Challenge events were held throughout the summer in Illinois, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska and Ohio.Abigail Myers of Springfield participated in the challenge and shared her experience in the following essay.Like most kids my age, I look forward to summer for a break from school with long days spent outside — hiking, swimming, enjoying barbeque at picnics and getting to hang out with my friends. And also like most kids my age, I have never given much thought to agriculture or where the food, that is part of so many of my favorite summer activities, comes from.This summer, in addition to all of my regular activities, I also got the chance to experience agriculture firsthand and learn how important it is to make sure the soil, where our food grows is healthy, thanks to the 4-H Ag Innovators Experience (AIE).Before participating in the AIE, I didn’t give much thought to how food is grown and raised. When I thought about where my food comes from, I thought about our local grocery store. Now that I’ve had the chance to learn that “soil” just doesn’t mean “dirt,” I have a new appreciation for agriculture and what it takes to grow the food that fills the grocery store shelves. Keeping soil healthy for the future will require continuous innovation and young people, like me, to help lead the way to solve new challenges.I really enjoyed getting to participate in the hands-on 4-H AIE Healthy Soils InvestigationAbigail Myers, left, of Springfield participated in the Healthy Soils Carbon Soil Investigation Challenge in Columbus this summer.Challenge and walked away with not only a fun experience, but a much better understanding of how agriculture is connected to our everyday lives. It was fun getting to work in teams to perform the Slake Test and Chemical Test to determine the health of our soil sample. Using the micro-robot to build a mini no-till planter was a bit challenging at first, but after a few tries, my team was able to build a planter that disrupted only a small amount of soil when planting which is good for the soil ecosystem.I believe it is imperative that young people learn about agriculture and understand the relevance of agriculture in their everyday lives. With the world population expected to reach nine billion by the year 2050, we will be tasked with the challenge of growing enough food. Young people are the new generation and soon they will be the ones behind the design boards, wearing lab coats and conducting the science experiments that will lead to new discoveries in agriculture.To learn more about the 4-H Ag Innovators Experience program, visit www.4-h.org/about/partners/monsanto/.last_img read more


first_imgThe Children’s Defense Fund-California will host its 26th Annual Beat the Odds ceremony on December 1, 2016 at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills, California.The celebration will honor five Los Angeles high school “stars” in recognition of their excellence in academic achievement, despite the overwhelming obstacles that stand in their way.The momentous occasion will be hosted by the Children’s Defense Fund President, Marian Wright Edelman, along with support from co-chairs, Jurnee Smollett-Bell & Josiah Bell, Carol & Frank Biondi, Ruth-Ann Huvane, Kevin Huvane, Katie Sharer & Mark Mullen, Liza & Conan O’Brien. O’Brien will also serve as the night’s emcee. He will be joined by additional special guests to be announced at a later date.WHEN: Thursday, December 1, 2016 5:30pm Media Check-in6:30pm Red Carpet ArrivalsWHERE: Beverly Wilshire Hotel 9500 Wilshire BlvdThe Children’s Defense Fund-California (CDF-CA) is the state office of the Children’s Defense Fund, a national child advocacy organization founded by Marian Wright Edelman that has worked relentlessly for over 40 years to ensure a level playing field for all children. CDF-CA was established in 1998 to meet the needs of underserved children in the state of California. With offices in Los Angeles, Oakland, Sacramento and Long Beach, CDF-CA champions policies and programs that lift children out of poverty, ensure all children have access to health coverage and care and a quality education, and invest in our justice-involved youth.last_img read more


first_imgKathleen Martens APTN NewsRexall PharmaPlus has apologized after two Indigenous teenagers say they were made to feel like thieves in its Comox Centre Mall store last weekend in British Columbia.The apology came after the mother of one teen sent an email to the company’s head office about how her 15-year-old daughter and 17-year-old friend say they were treated.“I’m impressed with Rexall’s response,” Carla Voyageur said of a promise by a senior manager to visit the store, speak to employees, and provide “sensitivity training.”Voyageur said a “rude” female manager at the Rexall told them they were under surveillance.Before that, at a different store, a male employee asked to see their hands were empty before they left the store.Her daughter’s friend vented her frustrations on social media.“Is this how native women are treated??” the teen wrote. “As if we are thiefs and want to attempt to steal at one store – which we were NOT.”Voyageur said the girls told her they were followed, stared at and made to feel badly about themselves while browsing makeup at the stores.The teen added in her post: “I doubt you’d have treated two non-Indigenous people with such disrespect.”Voyageur said her family moved to Vancouver Island a few months ago from Manitoba. She said they have now received warnings about “racism in the Comox Valley.”A spokesman for Rexall confirmed receiving the mother’s complaint.“On behalf of Rexall, we sincerely apologize for this unfortunate situation,” spokesman Derek Tupling said in an email to APTN News.“We take every complaint very seriously, and following a thorough review of the circumstances, this situation should have been handled differently…The store manager will also be reaching out to both individuals directly and inviting them back to the store to apologize in person.”Voyageur said the incident generated a family discussion about how the girls behaved in the store and what kind of customer service they should expect. She said they told her this never happens when they are with “non-Aboriginal friends.”Voyageur noted complaints were made to both stores but only Rexall responded.“These are responsible, goal-oriented teenagers,” she said. “I’m sorry this happened to them and for them.”[email protected]last_img read more


first_imgLONDON – The trade body representing British music warned Thursday that the industry’s financial fortunes, currently sky-high as a result of the popularity of the likes of Ed Sheeran, could be damaged in the event of a “bad Brexit deal.”The BPI, which has been championing the interests of big players such as Sony Music U.K. as well as more than 400 independent music companies for decades, said a failure to strike an adequate deal would prevent the industry becoming an “international calling card” in a post-Brexit world.“With Brexit approaching, music can help to showcase what is exciting about the U.K. as we forge new trading relationships, but only if our government supports us by ensuring a strong Brexit deal that enables artists to tour freely, robustly protects music rights, and prevents physical music products being impeded in transit,” said Geoff Taylor, the chief executive of BPI.Taylor’s warning came as the BPI reported booming British music exports last year, when they rose 12 per cent to 408.4 million pounds ($530 million). That’s the highest level since records began 18 years ago and means the total generated since 2000 is over 5 billion pounds.The BPI said U.K. artists accounted for one in every eight albums globally in 2017. And the world’s bestselling album was British in nine of the past thirteen years, most recently with Ed Sheeran’s “Divide.” Other British success stories in 2017 were Rag’n’Bone Man, whose debut album “Human” came in fourth, and Sam Smith’s “The Thrill of it All” at five.Revenue growth was particularly strong across Europe, up 29 per cent since 2015, with France doing particularly well. Europe remains the U.K.’s biggest export market for music, though the United States is the single biggest national market by a significant margin, accounting for more than 35 per cent of U.K. music earnings. Exports to China were also strong in 2017.Buoyant sales in Europe highlight the fact that British exporters are in a so-called “sweet spot” at the moment — British exporters have been able to benefit from the 15 per cent or so fall in the pound following the Brexit vote in June 2016 while still having full and unimpeded access to the European single market.With less than 30 weeks to go to Brexit, it’s still unclear how Britain will trade with the other 27 countries in the EU. Both sides have said they want to maintain smooth trade but the EU has insisted that Britain cannot continue to have the same sort of tariff-less access as it enjoys now if it doesn’t abide by the rules governing the single market, including the freedom of movement for people.last_img read more