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first_imgBRADENTON, Fla. — Exactly 24 hours later, the 49ers’ inability to come through in the clutch at Baltimore still stung, and coach Kyle Shanahan acknowledged as much.“We had our opportunities there at the end,” Shanahan said on a media conference call Monday. “Big miss not being able to convert that fourth-and-1.”When Jimmy Garoppolo’s fourth-down pass got batted away by Ravens 6-foot-5 lineman Chris Wormley, the 49ers never got the ball again, and the Ravens responded with a field goal as …last_img read more


first_imgOnly photos and the blueprints remainI visited Dr. Löf at the house just a few months before his death. He was bright, and we had a long conversation.He gave me the original set of blueprints to the house, and I suspect, sadly, that he recognized that the drawings wouldn’t be needed by the next owners of the property. In the 1970s, the George Löf house was frequently hailed for having the oldest continuously operating active solar heating system in the world. Löf lived in the home until his death in October 2009 at the age of 95. (For more information on George Löf, see my book, The Solar House: Pioneering Sustainable Design, or George Löf: Denver’s Solar Pioneer. A February 1958 magazine article on the George Löf house is available online: “Will Your Next House Get Its Heat from the Sun?”) RELATED ARTICLES Solar Versus Superinsulation: A 30-Year-Old DebateForgotten Pioneers of Energy EfficiencyThe History of Superinsulated Houses in North AmericaShades of Green: the 1970s vs. the Millennial Generation Present at the creationNobody played a more enduring role in the 20th-century solar house movement than George Löf. He was present at the creation, so to speak, having been a student of Hoyt Hottel when Hottel built the first-ever “active” solar thermal house at MIT in 1939. In 1945, Löf built the first active solar air system, a precursor to the system installed in the Denver house. He would remain active in the field for decades, and served a term as president of the International Solar Energy Society. A tear-downPrior to the demolition, the Löf house was in original condition, including the flat-plate solar collectors (air heaters) on the roof. It had hardly been touched since its construction 57 years ago: not even a coat of paint in my estimation. Image #2 (below) shows how the Löf house looked when I visited it in September 2011.At that time (two years after Löf’s death), the house was vacant and for sale. Because of the large size of the lot, the condition of the house, and the (wealthy) neighborhood, it was predictable that the house would be purchased as a tear-down. At that time I contacted the realtor and local preservation groups to make sure that the house’s importance was understood, but obviously to no avail.As I document and discuss in great detail in my book, the Löf house was remarkable for its technical innovation and for the sympathetic relationship between the architects (James Hunter of Boulder, assisted by Tician Papachristou) and the engineer (Löf). The design was celebrated by the New York Times for its heating system and Hunter’s “modern lines.”The rooftop collectors, still in place in 2011 and just barely visible behind plywood screens, produced hot air which could be sent straight to the rooms of the house or to gravel tubes that were used to store the heat. The sympathy between architecture and engineering was expressed most beautifully by Hunter’s decision to place the cardboard tubes near the staircase in the center of the house, visible from the entrance, and to paint them bright red. (And in a wonderfully poetic contrast he formed a concrete chimney from the same type of cardboard tube, and painted the chimney a cool blue.) Here is some sad but not surprising news: the George Löf house — one of the seminal buildings in the history of the solar house and certainly a modernist landmark worthy of protection and preservation — was recently destroyed. I visited the Denver site earlier this year and found a large excavation and a foundation (presumably) for a McMansion.Most of us associate the term “solar house” with the 1973 energy crisis. But the feasibility of solar houses in the 1970s would have been impossible without the earlier exploratory work by pioneers such as George Löf. The house Löf built for himself in Denver, in 1955-56, was a seminal experiment in solar heating, using an innovative system of rooftop collectors, solar-heated air, and gravel storage. It “became a model for emerging solar home heating systems and attracted engineers from around the world,” according to the Wall Street Journal. Anthony Denzer teaches architectural engineering at the University of Wyoming and is the author of The Solar House: Pioneering Sustainable Design.last_img read more


first_imgCreative Commons Licensing Flickr CAI “Best Practices” conference, Nov 2008 – 02 by Ed YourdonBy Robin Allen, MSPH, RDN, LDNPreviously as an Administrative Dietitian working in a major university’s dining services, I implemented “point of service” food item nutrition labeling. The intent was not just to point out calories but to provide complete nutrition information for our consumers that included not only college students but faculty and staff. Everyone loved the nutrition labeling except for those students with eating disorders and their health care providers on campus. Many expressed concern that putting calories on the menu was a “trigger” for people with eating disorders. Menu labeling was indeed a touchy subject! Do we change everything for those few? We had the information online, but most people were not aware or did not take the time to look up the items. I chose to continue the food labeling since most people were very appreciative of the information being provided. I also knew mandatory food labeling was on the horizon and indeed had been implemented in many states. Those poor students with eating disorders were going to face with food labels whether it was at school or throughout their daily lives. Some students I indeed worked with to help them handle the nutrition information and use it appropriately.We also learned a great deal about the foods we were serving. Some foods we had thought would be a “healthier” option was worse than the “non-healthy” food item due to food preparation techniques. Some days there would have been nothing to eat if you were looking for a lower fat, moderate in sodium diet. Menu labeling forced us to take stock and re-examine our menus to ensure were at least offering some healthier alternatives. Our goal was not to make everyone eat “healthy” but to at least provide the option and the information to make healthier food choices. Still, when finals week rolled around, all good intentions went out the window and the consumption of french fries, chicken tenders, and pizza skyrocketed! Stress eating is alive and well during finals week.What are the advantages and disadvantages of menu labeling? The “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act”, passed in 2010 required calorie labeling of menus. The requirement for calorie labeling was done to help stem the obesity epidemic and to help consumers make informed and healthier decisions about foods they eat.Some Advantages:1. May promote healthier choices by providing the public with more information to better understand what they eat.2. Provides consumers a guideline on what is a healthy caloric intake based on an average 1,800-2,000 calorie per day diet.3. Focuses on the prevention of chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, hypertension, and obesity.4. Provides nutrition education by requiring the visible display of calorie information and written information on other nutrients upon request.Some Disadvantages:1. There is an additional cost to restaurants and supermarkets for analyzing their food products to determine calorie information; printing new menus, food boards, displays, etc.2. There is a fear that sales of higher calorie foods will drop, which are frequently the most profitable.3. Consumers are not always aware of what is a “beneficial” food or “empty” calories.4. To analyze menus from scratch is very time-consuming and labor intensive.December 1, 2016, is the compliance date given by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for those restaurants to implement menu labeling. Food service operations covered under this ruling will have to list calorie information for standard menu items on menus and menu boards and a brief statement about suggested daily caloric intake. Nutrient information such as total calories, calories from fat, total fat, saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, sodium, total carbohydrates, fiber, sugars, and protein will have to be made available in writing on request. This FDA rule applies to food service operations that are part of a chain of 20 or more locations, doing business under the same name, and offering the same menu selections.Is the labeling of calories on the menu effective in helping consumers to make healthier or different food choices? One study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics indicated people who use menu calorie labels is associated with purchasing fewer calories. However, there are significant socioeconomic differences among customers who notice and use menu calorie labels. Targeted education programs may be needed to improve the use of menu labeling across all sociodemographic groups. Another study from New York University (NYU), found no significant differences in calories purchased before and after menu labeling was required in New York. Adolescents reported that taste was the most important factor in meal selection. This study was primarily conducted in low-income areas.Does menu labeling lead people to make healthier food choices? Do people even know what the labels mean? Are the labels accurate? How do we help our patients navigate the new menu labeling requirements to make healthier choices? Does putting the calories on the menu cause problems or “trigger” eating disorders?There are many unanswered questions, and this topic is now being studied extensively.Tune into our free webinar on October 20, 11:00 pm ET to get the most up to date information on menu labeling.Resources:Elbel, B,  Gyamfi, J, and Kersh, K. Child and adolescent fast-food choice and the influence of calorie labeling: a natural experiment. International Journal of Obesity (2011) 35, 493–500; doi:10.1038/ijo.2011.4; published online 15 February 2011Green, J E, Brown, AG, Punam O. Sociodemographic Disparities among Fast-Food Restaurant Customers Who Notice and Use Calorie Menu Labels. Jn of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 2015-07-01, Volume 115, Issue 7, Pages 1093-1101.Read more here.FDA on Food LabelsThis post was written by Robin Allen, a member of the Military Families Learning Network (MFLN) Nutrition and Wellness team which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families.  Find out more about the MFLN Nutrition and Wellness concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter and on LinkedIn.last_img read more


first_imgGet the Atomize Node for Autodesk Flame inside of Smoke…and enhance your effects capabilities. Find out the how in this video tutorial!Some may call it a hack (the developers would call it a bug), but for every Autodesk Smoke user out there, this is a must-have feature. Use Flame’s Automize node in Smoke.All of the Flame effects nodes in Action are readable by Smoke to maintain compatibility between the software. These nodes are normally read-only in Smoke and you can’t edit the properties. However, some users have created expressions and linked node properties to Matchbox effects or dummy Axis in Action.Due to an oversight in the code, the Atomize Node is freely available and editable inside of Smoke.  Check out the video to see how to get it and how it is used.last_img read more


first_imgSahil had a bad reputation in school. At the age of 14 he had already been suspended three times for various reasons ranging from smoking, bunking school and being rude to his teachers. Most teachers had given up on him and the staff room chit-chat was spiced up with Sahil’s latest antics. When he reached class 9, Neha, his young new teacher was warned by her colleagues to keep him in check. Everyone was surprised: Neha did not seem to be keeling under pressure with Sahil in her class. In fact, she couldn’t stop talking about how bright and talented he was. And as for Sahil, he seemed to be going through a gradual transformation.Instead of the surly, angry, disrespectful Sahil, the school saw a happier, brighter, confi-dent young man who seemed to be full of life! He was taking great interest in academics and focussing his energy in excelling in his passion-football. If you are wondering what made such a turn-around possible then there is a simple answer: mentoring!So what is mentoring exactly? Mentoring is a life changing connection that can open the window to a new world of optimism and hope. Where doubt can turn into possibility and possibility into passion. It is tragic that most teachers tend to limit themselves to just teaching chemistry, physics, mathematics when they could actually be mentoring their students and enriching them for life.Sir Ken Robinson, the revolutionary educationist describes the four roles of a mentor (The Element, Penguin 2009) as follows.Mentors recognise Mentors are able to see ability and gift in each child. Be it sports, academics, theatre, music, dance, interpersonal skills, poetry, leadership qualities, or any other thing. They notice the smallest of details. They go beyond the facade children present sometimes and see what makes them truly special.Mentors encourageRather than going down the beaten path of “let’s work on your weaknesses”, they believe in highlighting, nurturing and showcasing the child’s strengths. So the artistic child gets to decorate the board, the drama queen gets to organise a skit and the high-energy child is given the responsibility of managing all class events.Mentors FacilitateHave you ever seen the Canadian game of Curling? In this game, heavy blocks of granite are pushed on ice. The team which manages to take its stone to the target first is the winner. The sweepers, who with immense skill and strategy facilitate the speed and direction of the stone by clearing the pathway with their brooms, are the most fascinating part of the game. Mentors are like sweepers in Curling who can facilitate the blossoming of every child with their magical brooms! They have the knack of sweeping away feelings of self-doubt, low self-worth and confusion with similar skill and determination.Mentors stretch and nudge. They get directly involved in the children’s lives. From making time for the child, listening, connecting with the parents, they go beyond the typical role of a teacher. They gently nudge the child to go the extra mile. From getting the math whiz in the class to enroll in Math Olympiad, to making the shy orator shine on stage, they encourage children to take risks, be comfortable with failures and then try again. And behind it all, there’s a deep faith in the ability of each child.I like to think that a true mentor is like a prism. She captures the light in each child and turns it into a brilliant rainbow. That is the power of mentoring!advertisementlast_img read more