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first_imgEducation Minister Joe McHugh has given the go-ahead for a school extension at Robertson National School, Stranorlar.A new permanent classroom will be built to replace a prefab at the 66-pupil school, along with two Special Education Teaching rooms and a fully accessible special needs bathroom.Minister Joe McHugh made the announcement during a visit to the Robertson NS on Friday 21st June. Joe McHugh, TD, Minister for Education and Skills opens the newly refurbished playground at the Robertson National School, Stranorlar annual end of year event with the 6th Year Graduaton Cereomny. Photo Clive WassonThe Minister was attending an end of year event with 6th class graduation ceremony. He also officially opened the newly refurbished climbing frame and playground.Parents, pupils, staff and Board of Management were present to hear the announcement that the Minister had given the go ahead for the much-needed school extension.Joanne Rafferty, Tusla, Joe McHugh, TD, Minister for Education and Skills and Brian Bovaird Principal with borthers Eoin, Brógán and Daithí who received full attendance certificates at the Robertson National School, Stranorlar annual end of year event with the 6th Year Graduaton Cereomny. Photo Clive WassonJoanne Rafferty, Tusla, Brian Bovaird, Principal , Joe McHugh, TD, Minister for Education and Skills, Bonnie Oliver, Chairperson, BOM, Fintan Keating, St Marys Stranorlar, Principal and Fadhil Mistafa at the Robertson National School, Stranorlar annual end of year event with the 6th Year Graduaton Cereomny. Photo Clive WassonPrincipal Brian Bovaird commented on the announcement: “We are absolutely delighted with the announcement today. Our school has grown in pupil numbers in recent years and there will be 66 pupils enrolled in the coming school year, the school accommodation simply isn’t large enough to cater for these increased number of pupils.“We have 5 teachers, with two of them sharing a very small Principal’s office and a group of 26 infants using a very small prefab. Today’s announcement will provide the accommodation that pupils and staff deserve. We are very grateful for the approval by Minister McHugh today – he really is delivering for Donegal!” Clive Wasson was on hand to capture photos on the momentous day for the school:Students try out the new playground at the Robertson National School, Stranorlar annual end of year event with the 6th Year Graduaton Cereomny. Photo Clive WassonJoe McHugh, TD, Minister for Education and Skills speaking at the Robertson National School, Stranorlar annual end of year event with the 6th Year Graduaton Cereomny. Photo Clive WassonStudents perfroming at the Robertson National School, Stranorlar annual end of year event with the 6th Year Graduaton Cereomny. Photo Clive WassonGuests at the Robertson National School, Stranorlar annual end of year event with the 6th Year Graduaton Cereomny. Photo Photo Clive WassonBrian Bovaird, Principal at the Robertson National School, Stranorlar annual end of year event with the 6th Year Graduaton Cereomny. Photo Clive Wasson6th Years students with their teachers at the Robertson National School, Stranorlar annual end of year event with the 6th Year Graduaton Cereomny. Back from left are Laura Gallagher, Cheryl MacBeth, Kathleen McGinty, Brian Bovaird, Principal and Ms Callaghan. Front students Ava, Kelsey Kyra, Lorcan and Cameron. Photo Clive WassonJoe McHugh, TD, Minister for Education and Skills planting a tree at the Robertson National School, Stranorlar annual end of year event with the 6th Year Graduaton Cereomny. Photo Clive WassonMinister gives green light for Robertson NS extension – Picture Special was last modified: June 25th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more


first_imgThe New Age hopes to gain massivereadership quickly.(Image: Bongani Nkosi) Editor Henry Jeffreys said  they are notbiased towards the ANC.(Image: The New Age)MEDIA CONTACTS• The New Age+27 11 542 1222RELATED ARTICLES• Turning up the media volume• Praise for new isiZulu paper• New M&G journalism centre• Uganda’s media industry on a rollBongani NkosiThe New Age, the latest national newspaper to launch in South Africa, has finally hit the streets after delays of several months.The newspaper becomes the most recent to seek penetration into the challenging mainstream print media market. The first print version came out on 6 December 2010, with copies being sold across the country.The paper planned to launch in September, but this didn’t happen. In October it tried again, but efforts were scuppered by the resignation of appointed chief editor Vuyo Mvoko and four other key staff members.Following the setback, a new editor-in-chief, Henry Jeffreys, was appointed and he took up the post on 1 December. Jeffreys has a strong background in Afrikaans newspapers and was formerly editor of the daily Die Burger.The New Age is owned by business moguls with strong ties to the ruling African National Congress (ANC). Many media pundits have predicted that it will serve as a propaganda tool for the party and the government.It’s owned by TNA Media, whose executive chairperson Atul Gupta shares close ties with the ANC and the country’s President Jacob Zuma. TNA’s director Essop Pahad is an ANC veteran and was a minister in the presidency under Thabo Mbeki’s tenure.The paper’s owners have made it clear that The New Age will report on the government in a positive manner, but it will remain objective and it will not act as the government’s agent.It will not be biased towards the ANC, The New Age claims. “We hold no political brief for any political party or formation. We are proudly South African and fiercely independent – and owe allegiance only to our readers and South Africa,” said Jeffreys in a front-page note in the paper.Vow of deeper coverageThe broadsheet newspaper, which sells for R3.50 (US$0.50), is promising to cover all nine provinces in far more detail than any of its competitors. Wider coverage is an identified market gap, according to The New Age.“We aim to give a voice to under-reported rural and semi-rural communities,” said Jeffreys. “We hope we do not fail, especially in our efforts to cover the lesser known provinces.”The paper’s Sunday edition is still on hold, and the launch date will be announced in early 2011.The New Age is forecast to score big from state advertising, which, some have said, will be at the expense of other papers. The launch copy carries adverts from both the government and private sector.Experienced staff roped in Several experienced journalists from the print industry have joined The New Age, some from stables such as Independent Newspapers and Media 24.There’s an enormous expectation of The New Age to cover stories differently from its competitors, noted Xolani Mbanjwa, a senior political reporter formerly of Independent Newspapers.“We have to live up to the expectation that we will offer a different product to what is in the more established media publications,” Mbanjwa said in a statement on the eve of the launch.“For everyone involved it’s been a rollercoaster ride and we’re happy that we have the platform to produce a product that is credible and offers different voices.”Zinhle Maphumulo, the erstwhile Sowetan senior health reporter, said: “Finally we get the chance to prove to sceptics that we are not a government newspaper. We’ve waited a long time to come out.”last_img read more


first_imgBringing all U.S. homes to airtightness levels spelled out in the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code would save as much as $33 billion in energy costs annually, according to new research at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.Berkeley Lab scientist Jennifer Logue, lead author of the study, and her fellow researchers used “physics-based modeling” to calculate how much energy is wasted by air leaks, Berkeley Lab said in a news release. Researchers also wanted to identify a standard of airtightness that represented the best balance between costs and energy savings.Researchers considered five levels of tightening:“Average” tightening, which researchers defined as meeting levels of both the Weatherization Assistance Program and other non-WAP energy retrofit programs for an overall reduction in leakage of between 20% and 30%.“Advanced” tightening, in which all houses would be as airtight as the top 10% of houses with similar characteristics.Airtightness as defined by the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code, which is no more than 5 air changes per hour at a pressure difference of 50 pascals (ach50) in climates zones 1 and 2 and no more than 3 ach50 in climate zones 3 through 8.Canada’s R-2000 standard, which is 1.5 ach50.The Passivhaus standard of 0.6 ach50. IECC standard offers the best balanceThe total amount of source energy used in American homes is 22 quads (22 quadrillion BTUs) per year, or 23% of total U.S. consumption, the report says. Source energy includes the energy consumed on site plus the raw energy required to produce and deliver it.Tightening every one of the country’s 113 million homes to be as airtight as the top 10% of similar homes (what researchers called “advanced tightening”) would save 2.6 quads of energy per year, or roughly $22 billion, the report said.Getting to the IECC standard would save 3.83 quads, or $33 billion, annually. And that level offered most of the benefit of the two tighter standards while being more realistic to achieve. “According to their analysis, raising the U.S. housing stock to the IECC standard would reduce airflow in homes by a median value of 50 percent,” the Lab said.“As we move forward and look to build better housing stock, we want to know what standards we should enforce,” Logue was quoted as saying. “It looks like the IECC standard gets us the majority of the benefit of air sealing. More research is needed to determine the cost of implementing each of these standards in new homes to see which are cost-effective. As we get better at air sealing we can move towards tighter envelopes in buildings.” Ventilation carries low energy penaltyBerkeley Lab said the study took into account the amount of energy that would be required to increase ventilation to meet the ASHRAE 62.2 standard for healthy indoor air.“We found that the energy burden would be pretty small, only about an additional 0.2 quads of source energy annually to get everyone to the level where they’re getting enough whole-house ventilation,” Logue said in the press release.last_img read more