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first_img Share LocalNews Dominica benefits from the FCCA’s 30 – Destination Holiday Gist Program by: – January 10, 2012 Sharing is caring! Share Tweetcenter_img 10 Views   no discussions Share Crew members from the FCCA member cruise lines with some children from the Christmas party.The Florida Caribbean Cruise Association, this year, set out to cheer up the holiday for more than 6,000 underprivileged children from thirty (30) destinations throughout the Caribbean and Latin America. Being in its 18th year, the FCCA Foundation continues to improve the lives of citizens in the Caribbean and Latin America through projects such as this. As part of the 16th annual Holiday Gift Project, Two Hundred (200) underprivileged children from Dominica were treated to a very special holiday when they received gifts delivered by crew members from the FCCA member cruise lines, and the MV Caribbean Princess.The event which was organized by the Discover Dominica Tourism Authority, took place at the Public Service Union Building on Valley Road on December 15th 2011. Children came from areas across Dominica including Capuchin, Clifton, Cottage, Savanne- Paille, Portsmouth, Bourne, Paix Bouche, Thibaud, Vieille Case, Bense, Penville, St. Joseph, Salisbury, Layou, Tarreau, Mero, New Town, king’s Hill, Roseau, Bath Estate, Tarish Pit, Gutter, Stockfarm, and Fond Cole.The Discover Dominica Authority and the Ministry of Tourism wishes to extend heartfelt gratitude and sincere thanks to West Dominica Child Fund for their assistance, and local companies – Minya’s 7-11, Hara Agencies, Springfield Trading Ltd, and Starrin and Sons for their generous contributions of snack items towards the event.If Dominica is selected again in 2012 by the FCCA, the DDA anticipates the continued contributions from these generous business houses, and that of others, towards the continued success of this event.Press ReleaseDiscover Dominica Authoritylast_img read more


first_imgArea Basketball ScoresTuesday  (1-9)Boys ScoresOldenburg  36     South Ripley  30East Central  62     Richmond  55  (OT)Triton Central  90     North Decatur  84Girls ScoresEast Central  52     Dayton Dunbar  16Lawrenceburg  63     Jac-Cen-Del  53Rising Sun  40     Milan  36Hauser  46     Oldenburg  27Morristown  55     North DEcatur  48Trinity Lutheran  49     Waldron  37Henryville  64     Shawe Memorial  44SW Hanover  49     Christian Academy  36Rushville  47     Shelbyville  25Richmond  44     Connersville  42last_img read more


first_img February 28, 2020 University of Michigan says school hotline has received more than 100 unique complaints of sex abuse by late doctor Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — University of Michigan says school hotline has received more than 100 unique complaints of sex abuse by late doctor.center_img Associated Press last_img


first_imgA fire of unknown origin on Saturday morning destroyed a two-storey house located at Fairs Rust, Mackenzie, Linden, Region 10 (Upper Demerara-Berbice).The house was reportedly being rented by ex-cop Teon Allen, also known as “Spoil Child”.The house which was gutted by fire on SaturdayAuthorities are investigating the cause of the fire which occurred at about 03:00h.Allen is a suspected notorious gang leader and well-known criminal character.Most recently, he was shot after ranks of the Guyana Police Force intercepted the car he was travelling in at Houston, Greater Georgetown. He was last week released on bail after denying a charge of discharging a loaded firearm at an inspector along with illegal possession of a firearm and ammunition.last_img read more


first_imgAiming to set the stage alight for the Prime Minister’s Cup 2, which they are staging, and which is set to commence on October 19, 2018 at various venues in the city, the Georgetown Softball Cricket League (GSCL) Inc have now added another sponsor to their list in the form of Ink Plus.Ink Plus-GSCL Inc Secretary Telesha Ousman (right) accepts the cheque from Ink Plus sales representative Raveena MohanRepresentative of Ink Plus Sales, Raveena Mohan, has presented, as that company’s sponsorship, a substantial amount of money towards the GSCL Inc. Receiving on behalf of the GSCL was Telesha Ousman, at the entity’s location in Laluni Street, Queenstown.Mohan said, “We are happy to be given the opportunity to come on board, since this tournament only comes once a year. It is nice to see teams coming from overseas to rub shoulders with their Guyanese counterparts, and this will lift the level of the competition”.Mohan then wished the teams well, and said she is looking forward to an exciting and successful tournament.In a statement, Ousman said, “Teams will start arriving shortly, and Guyanese teams have already started their preparation”. The GSCL Inc secretary informed fans to expect some exciting cricket throughout the tournament, as there would also be off-field entertainment and promotional giveaways.Some of the venues identified for the preliminary matches are: the GNIC Sports Club ground; Muslim Youth Organisation (MYO) ground; Gandhi Youth Organisation (GYO) ground; Demerara Cricket Club (DCC), Malteenoes Sports Club (MSC), Police Sports Club ground at Eve Leary, and Everest Cricket Ground ground.In the Open segment, the winning team will take home $700,000 while the runner-up will receive $100,000. In the Masters’ category, the champion team will be awarded $600,000 and the runner-up $100,000. The tournament will feature some of the most modern technologies to grace cricket, such as lighted bails in the competition. Added entertainment will be provided by the Crossover Band and cheerleaders during the finals.The teams battling for supremacy in the All-stars (Open) segment are Wales Challengers, Enterprise Rebels, Hill Foot Vipers, Farm All-stars, Speedboat, Success, Regal Allstars, Corriverton, Bartica Allstars, SVC, and Booths XI. The Masters category will include Albion Masters, Regal Masters, Mike’s Wellman, Enterprise Masters, Ontario Masters, Narine Masters, Florida Guyana, Tropical Spring Masters, Parika Defenders and Fishermen Masters. The tournament will commence on October 21 at the Everest Cricket Club, Regal Masters and Speedboat (open) are the defending champions.last_img read more


first_imgQC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:08‘Partido Galing at Puso’ slate launched01:51Poe will get ‘overwhelming support’ from voters—Kapunan01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH As the day’s practice wraps up, Alapag notes it’s all about fine-tuning, now that it’s only a week away before Alab opens its campaign versus Hong Kong Eastern.“Anytime you get an opportunity to play the defending champion on opening night, it’s going to be a challenge,” he says. “It will give us a great barometer of where we are as a team. Whatever happens, it’s a long season.”Definitely, there’s still time for Alapag to learn. But hopefully, it won’t take long for him to start listing those wins. Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa First-timers, Soguilon make their mark Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netThere’s a whiteboard in the gym that neatly lists the team’s task for the day. Below the date, there’s an outline that starts with a warm up and goes down to the drills and different plays—pinky, zipper side, shirt.It’s a detailed to-do list crafted by a leader so meticulous but at the same time creative.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Read Next Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC But his new role as head coach of the country’s lone representative in the Asean Basketball League (ABL) has opened another set of challenges.“For so long, you’re playing on the court and you’re trying to make the big shots, you’re trying to give the correct assists. Now, being on the sideline, the focus is how can I put the team in the best position possible to be successful,” says the six-time PBA champion.“It’s almost like you’re back in school. You study how you can help the team, study your next opponent. But I don’t think there’s anything I didn’t expect. I think just in terms of planning, a lot of time goes into it.”But then, there’s a bit of worry: Remember when they said great athletes make horrible coaches?ADVERTISEMENT Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA LATEST STORIES “I’m definitely very detailed, but at the same time, I want to give these guys the freedom to play,” says Jimmy Alapag, the new coach of Tanduay Alab Pilipinas. “I want them to play to their strengths.”“I feel like the best basketball players are focused and disciplined, but there’s also the freedom to let them do what they do best,” he adds. “That’s what I encourage the guys [to] just play and do what [they] feel will make our team successful. I don’t want to give any limitations to what they can do.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutFor some, it might take some getting used to seeing Alapag orchestrating plays from the sidelines instead of the hardcourt where his leadership, on-court vision and incredible will to win made him a Philippine basketball legend.New role MOST READ John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Alapag thinks how he is as a coach is pretty much how he was as a player—the kind that drops by early in the gym and stays late “to sustain that edge.”“Every year there are new players always wanting to prove themselves. And as you get older, you want to keep that edge. And the only way to do that is to continue putting in the work, continue to be consistent with your work ethic. I want to apply that same thing in terms of coaching,” he says. “But now, instead of doing the shooting, the ball handling, it’s now watching videos, now it’s studying. Again, it’s like I’m back in school, learning.”And Alapag can get meticulous in learning. His passion for perfecting that stroke from beyond the arc—which, by the way, led to a PBA record for most number of career three-point shots made—runs similar to his current passion of wanting all coaching bases covered.Clearly, it’s one reason he tapped another PBA great, Danny Seigle, as one of his deputies.A different perspective“He’s one of the best players who ever played in the PBA. His basketball mind is very, very helpful to me,” says Alapag. “He’s another set of eyes. He might see something that I don’t, especially because he was a big guy in his career and I was never really much down there in the post in my career. It’s just a different perspective.”Alapag also doesn’t mind having around Mac Cuan, last year’s coach who slid down as assistant after steering Alab to a third-place finish.“His experience with the team last year is so important because this is my first time,” he says. “I’m leaning on him a lot in terms of his experience with the team.”Alapag, too, wants his relationship with his players—from young guns like Ray Parks to veterans like Dondon Hontiveros—to be just as smooth.“I want to establish relationships with these guys so that it’s not just a player-coach,” says Alapag. “I really want it to be a family environment. When you can create that environment, and then there are tough times later on, you can get through it. Just like any family that deals with hardship or any struggle.” No basketball-loving Pinoy fan, for sure, wants that to happen to Alapag. Not to this smallest guy with the biggest heart who unleashed dagger triples against long-time nemesis South Korea. Not to this captain who personified the Gilas Pilipinas team chant puso (heart) when he carried the country to its first World Cup victory in 40 years.Coaching perilsAlapag, though, knows the perils of coaching. He’s not too nervous, he says, since he tries to equip himself as much as he can.“It’s about the same as playing, or maybe a little harder just because your perspective of the game is much broader when you’re a coach,” says the 39-year-old Alapag. “You’re not on the court so you’re able to see what’s happening. And you have to do your best to break it all down and teach it to the team.”So maybe Alapag does know better, never mind the horror coaching stories. And perhaps, as some would think, isn’t there a Phil Jackson for every Magic Johnson?“It depends on the person, the player’s transition to coaching,” Alapag points out. “My approach going to this first head coaching job is leaning on the coaches that I played for, especially coach Chot (Reyes) and coach Norman (Black).”“A lot of my coaching influence is between the two of them—just picking their brains, their knowledge of the game,” he says. “I just feel very fortunate that in the last 14 years of my playing career, I’ve been able to be near them, learn from them and win with them. Hopefully, I can apply their advice this coming season.”As much as he has picked up pointers from Reyes, his coach in Gilas Pilipinas and Talk ’N Text, and Black, his mentor in Meralco, Alapag has also put in a lot of himself in formulating his own Xs and Os.“I’ve learned from them, and at the same time, I’m going by my experience—what made the teams I played for successful in terms of culture, environment. And of course, just working hard. Throughout my career that was really something I held on to very strongly—my work ethic,” says the former PBA Most Valuable Player.Sustain edgelast_img read more


first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man Utd draw up plans for four new signingsby Paul Vegas23 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United plan to make four new signings for the start of next season.The Manchester Evening News says United want to sign a full back, midfielder, a forward and a striker to add depth and quality to Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s squad.United chiefs ‘held a recruitment meeting’ at the start of last month to begin drafting a shortlist of targets for the January transfer window and next summer.It is claimed that James Maddison, Jadon Sancho, Ben Chilwell and Declan Rice are principal targets as they look to continue their recent transfer strategy of purchasing young, British players.The club know that those deals would require significant negotiating and therefore the club is also drafting a longer list of targets. last_img read more


Friday, Feb 27, 3:28 p.m.The panel: “Commissioner’s Perspective: 1 on 1 with Rob Manfred”The panelists: Brian Kenny, Rob ManfredRob Manfred has a long history with Major League Baseball. And Major League Baseball has long tried to avoid letting its history weigh it down. In a wide-ranging interview at Sloan on Friday, one month into his tenure as league commissioner, Manfred sounded like a man trying to make sense of how to reform a game without hollowing it out.A few days ago, Manfred said that there was a universe in which baseball could shave eight games off its regular-season schedule “sometime down the road.” A reduction in the current 162-game schedule could make the sport’s playoff timing a little more flexible, and might increase fan interest in each game. At Sloan, Manfred said he chose the 154-game mark because it would take the majors “back to a number that’s already in our record books.” Could he see MLB going even lower, to 150? No, because then “you’re going to go have a record book with 150, 154, 162 …” Only in baseball, a sport hallowed enough to get the Ken Burns treatment, could the record book be more important than the ledger. Integrity is paramount. (Or as Manfred, who has worked for the league for nearly two decades, put it when talking about whether to reform gambling laws around sports betting: “Integrity, it’s Rule One.”)Yet this is a commissioner who clearly wants to find ways to change the game. Manfred has introduced rules to speed the pace of play, and said Friday he’s very happy with the replay system MLB added last year. He said that in the future — “past Rob Manfred” — the league could have a team outside North America, and before that, maybe even one in Mexico. Now that would be historic. — Chadwick Matlin Sunday, March 1 12:17 a.m.After what conference co-organizer Jessica Gelman said was a “heated discussion,” voters for the top research paper at Sloan reached a split decision and split the $30,000 prize pool between two papers. The winners:Who is Responsible for a Called Strike? by Joe Rosales and Scott SprattCounterpoints: Advanced Defensive Metrics for NBA Basketball by Alexander Franks, Andrew Miller, Luke Bornn and Kirk GoldsberryRosales and Spratt, both of Baseball Info Solutions, presented work suggesting that pitch framing, which has traditionally rewarded most of the credit to catchers alone, is actually a function of three independent participants: the catcher, pitcher, and umpire.Franks, Miller, Bornn, and Goldsberry — all members of Harvard’s XY Hoops group — used player tracking data to quantify individual defensive play in the NBA. The academic version of this group’s paper has been accepted at the statistics journal Annals of Applied Statistics.The groups behind the winning papers each received $15,000 for their efforts. Additionally, Bornn and Goldsberry, along with co-authors Alex D’Amour and Dan Cervone, received the conference’s top poster prize of $1,000 for “Move or Die: How Ball Movement Creates Open Shots in the NBA.” — Mike Lopez Friday, Feb 27, 11:55 a.m.Daryl Morey has been as instrumental to the rise of the Sloan conference as he has been to the rise of the Houston Rockets. Morey, the general manager of the Rockets, has steered the team to third place in the Western conference — behind MVP-candidate James Harden, whom he acquired in a now-legendary 2012 trade — and helped start the Sloan conference in 2007. At Sloan on Friday, I boxed him out to ask a few questions about advanced basketball analytics, specifically player-tracking data from companies like STATS’ SportVU technology. While he can’t divulge the details of the Rockets’ private statistics, Morey’s remarks about the publicly available numbers are especially insightful because the Rockets are one of the most stats-savvy teams — not just in the NBA, but in all of sports. — Andrew FlowersAudio Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/flowers_morey.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Saturday, Feb. 28 3:15 p.m.Will sports betting inevitably become legal in the U.S.? It sure seems like it.Momentum behind legalization has grown since NBA Commissioner Adam Silver wrote an Op-Ed in the New York Times in November 2014 explicitly endorsing legal sports gambling. The facade of professional sports leagues that oppose sports betting is beginning to crack. And it’s clear why: money.Silver estimated the market for illegal sports wagering is currently $400 billion per year, though it’s likely that figure is inflated. But even lower-end estimates of around $80 billion still represent a huge market. Sports betting is already enormous in Europe, Australia and many other regions. State governments want in because of the potential revenues.Professional sports leagues are intrigued because they see gambling interest as a ratings driver, much like fantasy sports have been. (And, coincidentally, daily fantasy sports sites – with cash prizes – bear an eerie resemblance to gambling anyway.) Gambling is already inherently analytical; but the appetite of stats-savvy fans for geeky coverage about odds is growing. Jeff Ma, a contributor to ESPN’s new sports-betting site, Chalk – said gambling analytics would meet the demand from those with a “high-brow” interest.But there are major risks to legalization. The revelations that former NBA referee Tim Donaghy owed gambling debts and bet on games he officiated was a reminder of the long, scandalous history of how gambling can challenge the integrity of sports. Here, too, analytics can help. Ryan Rodenberg, a professor at Florida State University, suggested statistical scrutiny of betting markets would combat fraud and fixing. Several private European firms already specialize in such analytics.The panelists were asked that if they had to bet on legalization sweeping the country, when it would happen. The lines offered by the panelists ranged from 2-to-10 years. Dan Spillane, the Assistant General Counsel for the NBA, didn’t offer a timeline, however. He just said “years, not months.” — Andrew Flowers Saturday, Feb. 28, 1:00 p.m.The session: “Analytics of the Tommy John Injury Epidemic”The speaker: Glenn FleisigWe’re in the midst of an epidemic of elbow injuries among major league pitchers. Twenty-five percent of current MLB pitchers have had an ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (“Tommy John surgery”) and 15 percent of minor league pitchers have undergone the procedure. Over the last decade, the problem has trickled down to high school and little league players. In 1990, none of the baseball players coming to the Andrews Sports Medicine & Orthopaedic Center clinic Tommy John surgery were kids. Today, one third of them are high school age or younger, said Fleisig, the research director at the American Sports Medicine Institute.What’s to blame for the epidemic of torn elbow ligaments? Are more players getting hurt? Or are we just better at diagnosing these injuries? Are doctors more willing to do the procedure? Or are patients more eager to have it?The answer, said Fleisig, is all of the above. Some players assume they should go in for surgery at the first sign of elbow pain, just “to get it over,” but that’s the wrong attitude. Best case scenario, the surgery can return a player to the career trajectory he was on before he got injured, but it won’t improve performance and not every player makes it back to play, Fleisig said.About 80 percent of major league players who get Tommy John surgeries make it back to the mound, but only two thirds of those who undergo the procedure make it back and stay there.Most elbow ligament injuries occur due to overuse. During the middle part of the pitch when the elbow is held upright at a right angle, the joint experiences severe torque. “It’s like holding a string with five 12-pound bowling balls,” Fleisig said. (That’s why doping raises the risk of an elbow injury — “If you’re on the juice you’re making your muscles too strong for your tendons and ligaments to handle.”)There’s a common notion that curveballs are dangerous, but the research doesn’t bear that out, Fleisig said. “We expected the curveball to have more torque than the fastball, but it turns out it has less.”Four things determine which players get injured — biomechanics, how much a player pitches, training and recovery. “It’s not one of these things or the other, it’s all of them,” Fleisig said.Wear and tear on the elbow is one of the most important factors, and when Fleisig’s group followed a group of 500 kids over a ten-year period, they found that pitching more than 100 competitive innings more than tripled the risk of needing a Tommy John surgery. Likewise, more than 80 pitches per game quadrupled the risk of injury, and kids who pitched when fatigued had 36 times the risk of having surgery.In an effort to cut the rates of elbow injuries among young pitchers, Fleisig and his colleagues have teamed with Major League Baseball to create Pitch Smart, age-appropriate guidelines to avoid injury. Suggestions include limits on the number of pitches thrown and not pitching when fatigued. “The best computer we have is right here,” Fleisig told me, pointing to his head. — Christie Aschwanden Saturday, Feb. 28 4:05 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 28, 11:20 a.m. Friday, Feb 27, 12:21 p.m.The Panel: “Valuing Franchises: How Sports Teams Break the DCF”The Panelists: Lyle Ayes, Aswath Damodaran, Joe McNulty, Randy Vataha, Abe Madkour (moderator)The recent sales of the Los Angeles Dodgers and Clippers for over $2 billion have opened up a new paradigm in sports franchise valuations. As shocking as the price of those transactions may have been, the mood at this Sloan panel was buoyant. In fact, panelists seemed to be most worried about prices getting so high that billionaires would be priced out of the market. As Lyle Ayes, managing director of the investment bank Evercore’s sports advisory practice said, “how many people can pay $4 billion for an asset?”Panelists thought the seemingly inexorable rise in franchise valuations was driven by the increasing value of media and content rights. Aswath Damodaran, an NYU professor who focuses on valuation (and FiveThirtyEight contributor), commented that across the entertainment industry, owning content is becoming king. Ayes cited the NBA’s massive new TV deal as evidence of this trend. He noted that advertisers put a large premium on live content like sports because viewers are relatively captive during the event. Interestingly, none of the panel members thought that a team’s performance had a large impact on valuation. The most important factor, according to the panel, was metro area population and GDP. The New York Knicks can command significantly more from their local TV rights for bad basketball than the San Antonio Spurs can command for good.Despite the increase in the real earnings of teams as media deals improve, panelists (with the exception of Ayes), broadly agreed that sports franchises still do not make sense as actual businesses. While they are relatively low-risk and uncorrelated with other potential investments, almost any analysis of the current cash flows — or lack thereof — will not find them to be great investments. As Damodaran noted, the supply of franchises is relatively fixed, while demand has been growing. The panelists did not see this dynamic changing any time soon. — John Ezekowitz Friday, Feb 27, 2:20 p.m.The panel: “Basketball Analytics: Push the Tempo”The panelists: Shane Battier, Mike Zarren, Sue Bird, Mike D’Antoni, Pablo TorreAre basketball teams now so saturated with data and analytics that it’s hard to use them for a competitive advantage?Mike Zarren, assistant general manager for the Boston Celtics, raised an interesting point about what qualifies as analytics in an analytics age. “If I know how well a player slept last night, is that analytics?” The breadth of topics discussed — injuries, biometrics, pace, traditional positions, rest, incentives, shot selection, team chemistry — reveal what a truly broad spectrum of questions and answers fall under the umbrella of basketball analytics. However the field is defined, it all serves the same master: talent. Shane Battier, the poster boy for the adoption of analytic ideas at the player level, summed up the mission perfectly: “It’s about creating space to allow talent to do what they do.”Zarren returned to a well-worn focus at this conference — communication of insights — and defended that arena as the place where a competitive advantage still exists: “You have to use it, it has to affect the decisions you make. I don’t think there is a saturation of that yet.” — Ian Levy Friday, Feb 27, 10:40 a.m.The panel: “Innovators and Adopters”The panelists: Shane Battier, Michael Lewis, Daryl Morey, Jeff Van Gundy and Jackie MacMullanPity Carmelo Anthony and Kobe Bryant. Out for the season with injuries after performances well below their high standards, they’re now punching bags in Boston, at least according to the first session of the Sloan Sports Analytics Conference on Friday.The other panelists treated the retired Battier more or less as Lewis depicted him in a New York Times Magazine article in 2009: the platonic ideal of the intelligent NBA player, one who incorporates insights from advanced statistical analysis to optimize his game for team success. (Battier initially resisted that framing, saying “it was about winning,” before eventually letting on that yeah, he was a pretty smart player.) LeBron James, with whom Battier won two titles in Miami, was the more typical player, open to occasional tastes of analytics-based tips.Anthony and Bryant, though, were depicted as the anti-Battiers, in a question by moderator MacMullan (who, like Battier, works for ESPN, which owns this website and sponsors Sloan). MacMullan noted their selfishness and focus on scoring over other ways of contributing to their teams. (To which my boss, Nate Silver, would respond that Anthony’s shooting makes his teammates better.) Battier made clear how much he relished having those two stars as foils, learning their tendencies so that he could neutralize their strengths when playing defense. MacMullan pointed out that Battier blocked more of their shots than any other player’s. Anthony also topped the Battier leaderboards for balls stolen and offensive fouls drawn. And the pair led another personal leaderboard Battier innovated: They gave him the most “looks of disdain” when they found out he’d be guarding them. — Carl Bialik Friday, Feb 27, 4:35 p.m.At last year’s Sloan conference, Dean Oliver was our ESPN colleague, leading analytics at the Stats & Info Group. This year, he’s here as the Sacramento Kings’ director of player personnel and analytics. I spotted him Friday huddled with a few of his peers from other NBA franchises. Oliver has been in the sports analytics business for three decades, and has seen it grow from a field wrestling with a lack of data to one with more data than it knows what to do with. He spoke with me about the similarities in working for teams and working for sports media, and about what it takes for a franchise to succeed at using analytics. — Carl Bialik Friday, Feb. 27, 6:10 p.m.Walking into a conference at Sloan today I walked by yet another guy in a sports coat — and then did a double take, because this guy’s blazer sleeves were rolled up…and he was a 13 year-old. There are some teenagers running around Sloan but none looked younger than Sam Hafetz and his friends, Manu Hurskovitz, 14, and Jonah White, 14. After calling their parents for permission (hi, Mr. Hurskovitz!), I dragged them to our podcast table. There, Jody Avirgan asked what brought them to Sloan (it’s their second year attending), why they love sports analytics, and what they’d do if they became GMs of the Celtics. — Chadwick MatlinAudio Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/kidsatsloan.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Friday, Feb. 27, 4:43 p.m.The panel: “Commissioner’s Perspective: Growing Soccer with Don Garber”The panelists: Don Garber, Grant WahlMLB and MLS share two letters and the pickle of how to balance tradition and innovation. Baseball’s struggle comes from within, as Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred showed earlier Friday. Major League Soccer isn’t as conflicted about changing rules and trying new technologies, MLS Commissioner Don Garber said. Its burden, unlike MLB’s, is its peripheral place in a global game.Garber said he wanted goal-line review technology, extra time put on scoreboards (instead of only a ref with a “Timex that probably cost 20 bucks” knowing how much time remains) and a whole lot more. “If I were king, we would have instant replay, we would have cameras on our players, we would be putting them on goalposts.” He’d put a microphone on the field. Players would wear GoPro cameras. He watched hockey players wear GoPros at the NHL All-Star Game and thought it was cool.But Garber can’t have all those things. Other sports’ U.S. pro leagues just need to get the owners to agree, but MLS needs the approval of IFAB, the International Football Association Board — or, as Garber called it, the International Federation of Somebody Who Has Something To Do With the Rules That’s Not Me. Garber’s message to IFAB: “Let us be the Guinea pigs.” He worries that the world’s most popular sport could lose its lead “just because of our structure. We should be able to use the power of our influence to lead.” — Carl Bialik Saturday, Feb. 28, 9:50 a.m.There are bold-faced names headlining the ninth annual Sloan Sports Analytics Conference, sure. But for academics like myself the real action is in the research paper contest, where academics and researchers are hoping to create the kinds of insights that the bold-faced names one day treat as gospel. For these researchers, Sloan marks the culmination of what can be more than a year’s worth of work. The stakes are high: top prize is $20,000, with second place worth $10,000. For some of the PhD students submitting papers, that may equal their annual salary.But until now, the mechanics of how this contest is judged have largely been cloudy (see an overview of the 2015 contest here, or my personal experience submitting a paper to the 2014 contest here). On Friday, conference co-lead Paul Campbell helped clarify how Sloan makes its picks. “We try to be consistent about what we solicit,” said Campbell. “We kind of have our perspective on the validity of the method, and making sure that the academic and mathematical rigor is there. Also, do the results make sense?”The 2015 research paper contest began back in September, when Campbell and this year’s judging committee, comprised of various MIT student organizers and academic advisers, received 189 abstracts. Of that total, 68 were invited to turn in a formal paper for submission in mid-December. Paper submissions were placed into one of four tracks: basketball, baseball, other sports or the business of sport. The top two submitted papers from each track were given the opportunity to present at this year’s conference. In addition, 11 papers were given a poster in the halls of the convention center.Each of the eight finalists were allotted a 20-minute presentation on Friday. The judging committee identified the top presentation in each of the four categories based on a 50-50 split of the presentation itself and the originating paper.“We have an idea of what the best analytically rigorous paper is, but we want to see if it is presented well. It’s an equal weighting with [the presentation] and the paper,” said Campbell. The four papers still in the running for the top prize, are:Baseball: Who is Responsible for a Called Strike? by Joe Rosales and Scott SprattBasketball: Counterpoints: Advanced Defensive Metrics for NBA Basketball by Alexander Franks, Andrew Miller, Luke Bornn and Kirk GoldsberryOther Sports: Assessing the productivity of NHL players using in-game win probabilities by Stephen PettigrewBusiness of Sports: Diamonds on the Line: Profits Through Investment Gaming by Clayton Graham.Those four finalists are given an additional 10 minutes with which to make their case, this time in front of a larger and more general audience, including Houston Rockets GM Daryl Morey and FiveThirtyEight’s own Nate Silver.Those judges, according to Campbell, are asked to judge by something different than the last committee. “Which of these [papers] seems like the most applicable or potentially transformative within the industry?” $20,000 rides on the answer. — Mike Lopez Saturday, Feb. 28, 1:46 p.m.The panel: “Beating the Shift: Baseball Analytics in the Age of Big Data”The panelists: Sandy Alderson, Dan Brooks, Dave Cameron, Ben Lindbergh, Jonah KeriSloan’s flagship baseball panel largely focused on teams’ reactions to sabermetric findings. Alderson, the general manager of the New York Mets, spoke about the proliferation of defensive shifts, and how it has led to changes in the way certain players are valued — specifically right-handed power hitters.Along the same lines, no discussion of baseball analytics would be complete without some mention of strike zone analysis and catcher pitch-framing metrics. Despite the volume of research on the subject in recent years, the consensus of the group was that the market may still not be properly valuing catchers who “steal” strikes on the edge of the strike zone at a higher rate than their peers. Then again, part of that may relate to a theory that pitch-framing is a taught skill. (We’d have liked to hear more thoughts about how umpires doing better at calling an accurate strike zone has led to baseball’s aforementioned drop in run-scoring.)Finally, Keri asked the panel their thoughts about wins above replacement (WAR). The panel agreed WAR was a valuable framework, even if its individual parts can always stand to be improved. For his part, Alderson confirmed that teams use at least some version of it, even with its imperfections, because the idea of creating a cumulative statistic is appealing. — Harry Enten and Neil Paine FiveThirtyEight’s delegation made the pilgrimage to this year’s Sloan conference, a kind of mecca for anyone who’s obsessed with sports, data and retelling how they first felt when they read “Moneyball.” We updated all of Friday and Saturday from Boston, where Houston Rockets GM Daryl Morey, MLB commissioner Rob Manfred and our own Nate Silver roamed the halls. Read on for highlights from the weekend. CORRECTION (Feb 28, 9:47 a.m.): A previous version of this article misstated the ages of Sam Hafetz and Jonah White. read more


first_img Sandals drops major bomb, makes Misick brothers look terribly suspect Recommended for you PNP Party says it led wooden pier removal by Beaches Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:beaches resort and spa, hiv prevention, monet collymore, share your christmas, tci social welfare office Beaches puts former Premier on blast about controversial pier Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 07 Jan 2016 – There are 112 families in the Turks and Caicos who have reported that they need help just to eat each day. There is a need for HIV/Aids patients to ensure they not only eat well, but on time. On Wednesday, Beaches Resort Villages and Spa made a move to close the gap between having and not having food at home by donating some 4,000 non-perishable food items gathered from its staff. The National HIV Prevention Unit & The Turks and Caicos Social Welfare Office in Grand Turk Pantry are the beneficiaries of the initiative which started this noble work three years ago. Monet Collymore, who heads the Beaches Environmental Health Services Department said: “Our mission is to feed unemployed single mothers and persons living with HIV & AIDS on the islands of Provo and Grand Turk.” Beaches explained that the two organizations were selected because they play crucial roles as keepers of people in need of support. The TCI Social Welfare Office assists the unemployed and under employed financially and directly impacts the lives of single mothers, children, the disabled and the elderly by providing them with monetary support and where possible, food and clothing. The HIV prevention unit assists with providing medical support services to those infected with the virus. The office also provides healthy meals to individuals on the islands of Provo and Grand Turk. The Share Your Christmas or SYC program of Beaches ran the food drive among staff from December 11 through to January 4.last_img read more

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