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first_img NEW VERSION OF CRICKET The International Cricket Council (ICC) World Twenty20 tournament of 2016 is behind us and despite many events of its kind – and many successful ones at that – the world of cricket can truthfully say that this one was a tremendous success. Maybe it was the different types of pitches found in India this time around and maybe it was the different kinds of bowling, especially the presence of right-arm leg-spin bowling, which made it so successful. Maybe it was the quality of batting throughout, the tournament and the brilliance of the fielding which lifted the standard and thus the excitement throughout and maybe it was the energy and performance of the minnows which caused it all. Maybe it was, in the final analysis, the performance of the big hitters of the West Indies which made the difference and the stylish and dramatic way in which they ended the tournament on a winning note, with the ball disappearing into the outskirts of Kolkata. Maybe it was simply an improving mindset by the players. Whatever it was that caused it, it was a tournament to remember and to duplicate and, at least, the next time around. For years now, and but for a few changes, cricket has remained the same. It has been basically the same teams, with nothing new to add spice and colour to the scenery. Cricket, it is said, is a hard game to learn, but that is Test cricket. RANKED NO. 3 T20 cricket is ranked number three in the general scheme of things. It is played regularly in local competitions, hardly in international competitions and up to last month, it was played every two years as a world tournament. Regrettably, it is scheduled for every four years as of the next time. T20 cricket is big business. It is, however, easy to play, it is fun, it caters to the spectators, and although the players, including the West Indies players, or most of them, prefer the Test version, it is the most popular format today. T20 cricket is ideal as a tool to spread the game. The minnows can upset the ‘big boys’ occasionally, just as how The Netherlands defeated England in both the 50-over World Cup and the World Twenty 20 and just as how Afghanistan defeated the West Indies a few weeks ago in the World Twenty20. Those defeats were embarrassing for England and that defeat was also embarrassing for the soon-to-be crowned world champions, West Indies, a few days ago. They added to the excitement of the tournament, however, and as far as The Netherlands and Afghanistan are concerned, they contributed to the growth of the game. The ICC has a duty to its minnows and a responsibility to cricket to let them loose and offer them more opportunities. This is the time to allow cricket to grow. There is a new version of cricket, however. It is T20 cricket. It is taking over like wildfire and it has given those in charge the opportunity to spread their wings, to cover the whole wide world. For years now, there has been a call to add more teams to cricket and there has always been a counterclaim by the ‘big shots’ of cricket that the game would be too one-sided if that was done. There is no doubt that was true. Can you imagine a Test match between Australia and Canada at the Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG) and, at end of day two, at the end of the first innings, the scoreboard read: Australia 400 for one or two declared, Canada70 and 20 for five? Who would watch this match and who would pay for the exercise? Based on their performances over the years and their performance this year, however, the minnows, or some of them Ireland, the Netherlands, Oman, Afghanistan, Scotland, Hong Kong and Kenya, deserve their places. And so do others like Papua, New Guinea, Canada and the USA. If they never get to compete, no one will ever know of them, just as we would never have known of players like Mohammad Shahzar; Afghanistan’s batsman Kyle Coetzer; Scotland’s batsman Zeeshan Maqsood; Oman’s batsman Dawlat Zadran; Afghanistan’s pacer and one of the real finds of the tournament, Afghanistan’s young right-arm leg-spinner Rashid Khan. And what of countries like China, Argentina and even Brazil if they so desire? T20 cricket is made for them.last_img read more


first_imgThe Guyana National Bureau of Standards (GNBS) on Friday hosted a simple ceremony to bid farewell to six work-study students who completed their six-week stint with the organisation.Officials along with the work-study students at the closing ceremony on FridayThese students, who completed secondary and tertiary institutions, benefited from the experience of working with staff within multiple departments of the National Standards body.Completing the work-study were: Rawle Douglas, Ayeshia Carter, Avanelle Meusa, Letecia Hassan, Shennisa Daniels, and Ashley Mohanlall.Speaking at the ceremony were the various Heads of the Departments (HoDs) to which the trainees were attached. The HoDs commended the students for their demonstrated commitment to the GNBS, shown by their punctuality, attendance and their desire to participate and become knowledgeable about the activities conducted by the organisation.Lisa Ahmad, Head Human Resource and Administration commended the students for aligning and conducting themselves with the GNBS core values of accountability, synergy, professionalism, innovation, respect and efficiency. She encouraged the students to take these values with them throughout their professional and personal lives for continued success.Further, the trainees were encouraged by Shailendra Rai, Head of Product Compliance Department to take note of what is occurring in the local oil industry.He urged them to do their research and to be engaged in the relevant studies to align themselves for employment in this major industry or supporting industries.On behalf of their counterparts, Meusa and Douglas thanked the GNBS for the amazing experience they had with the organisation.They both alluded that during this first experience of work they benefitted significantly from the knowledge freely imparted by staff of the GNBS.last_img read more


first_imgKenneth JacksonAPTN National NewsWINNIPEG – At 5 a.m. Sunday an intoxicated child welfare “runaway” was seen stumbling near corner of Ellice Avenue and Young Street.It wasn’t clear where she was coming from or what happened to her, and she was just wearing a bra and pants.But the “girl in the shadows” was there.Her first instinct was to help.She offered the 16-year-old Aboriginal girl a cigarette.“I asked her what happened and she didn’t remember,” says the young woman connected to the streets in Winnipeg who requested anonymity. She was recently profiled by APTN who called her the “girl in the shadows.”For this story we’ll call her “Hope.”“I asked her if she wanted me to call an ambulance,” she said.The girl didn’t want one called.But she needed someone.“I didn’t want her to take off so I couldn’t make the call myself,” said Hope, who texted someone to call police and for them to come to Ellice and Young.A police officer said “don’t let her go” before they could come and take her to safety.They did arrive and took her somewhere to get help.“She’s in their hands,” said Hope on Sunday an hour after helping the girl. “Victory.”APTN asked Winnipeg police to confirm the information and if Child and Family Services was involved.“Yes, a 16-year-old girl was located. CFS was notified and the female was taken to an appropriate location to ensure she remained safe,” said police spokesman Const. Jason Michalyshen.He said a follow-up investigation into a possible attack or assault wasn’t immediately launched.“No, not at this time,” said Michalyshen. “The female was not forthcoming with information.”APTN spent a few days in June walking the streets in Winnipeg. Reporters came across a young woman who looks out for kids on the street.She sits in the shadows writing down license plates of men trolling for sex workers, particularly one who is her friend, on the edge of downtown.Winnipeg has a problem with youth being exploited, so much so they developed a specialized project aimed at ” protecting youth within our city who are at high risk of being sexually exploited.”The project hit the streets June 18 looking for youth being exploited.They checked 46 addresses for missing youth.Five “at risk” youth between the ages of 14-15 were found and taken to [email protected]last_img read more


first_imgAccording to researchers, a woman’s choice to fit in with a crowd or stand out may depend on the size of her high heels which explains the deep human urge to gain status in the society.The findings showed that women adopt local trends like changing the size of heels while moving to richer parts of the city but ignore them when they move to socio-economically lower areas.“In other words, most women want to look like rich girls and different from the poor girls,” said Kurt Gray, assistant professor at University of North Carolina in the US. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’While moving to posh cities, women tend to closely try and match the size of their heels with the heel size of other women in that city, showing a deep desire for conformity. However, on the contrary, in a bid to keep up with their individuality, they match the size of their heels with the size of their own past purchases, when shifting to poorer localities.The researchers labelled this phenomenon as “trickle down conformity”, because fashion preferences trickle down from the top but seldom up from the bottom.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix“From the beginning of time, people have thirsted for respect and social standing, and have aligned themselves with the powerful and distanced themselves from the powerless. So it makes sense that they do the same with heel sizes,” Gray explained in the paper published in the journal PLOS ONE. This “aspirational fashion” of people want to look rich is getting more prevalent, with the increasing inequality in society and widening gap between rich and poor.  To examine this trend, the researchers teamed up with a large-online fashion retailer. They examined the size of high heels in five years of shoe purchases —16,236 in total _of 2007 women who moved between one of 180 US cities. Such aspirations also fuel the fortunes of fashion sites that provide high-status goods for low prices, the researchers noted, adding that the phenomenon may also apply to men. “Men do the same thing when they purchase clothes, electronics or cars,” Gray said.last_img read more

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