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first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSALT LAKE CITY (AP)-Brooklyn Nets (30-14, second in the Eastern Conference) vs. Utah Jazz (31-11, first in the Western Conference)Salt Lake City; Wednesday, 8 p.m. MDTBOTTOM LINE: Utah will try to keep its 16-game home win streak alive when the Jazz face Brooklyn.The Jazz have gone 16-2 in home games. Utah is 17-4 against opponents under .500.The Nets have gone 13-8 away from home. Brooklyn is eighth in the NBA scoring 14.3 fast break points per game led by Kevin Durant averaging 3.4.The two teams square off for the second time this season. The Nets defeated the Jazz 130-96 in their last meeting on Jan. 5. Kyrie Irving led Brooklyn with 29 points, and Donovan Mitchell paced Utah scoring 31 points.TOP PERFORMERS: Mitchell leads the Jazz averaging 3.3 made 3-pointers, and is scoring 25.4 points per game while shooting 37.8% from beyond the arc. Rudy Gobert is averaging 13.8 rebounds and 16.1 points per game over the last 10 games for Utah.James Harden is averaging 25.4 points and 8.7 rebounds for the Nets. Joe Harris is averaging 3.2 made 3-pointers and scoring 13.4 points over the last 10 games for Brooklyn.LAST 10 GAMES: Jazz: 5-5, averaging 119.4 points, 46 rebounds, 23.7 assists, 7.4 steals and 5.4 blocks per game while shooting 46.5% from the field. Their opponents have averaged 117 points on 49.0% shooting.Nets: 8-2, averaging 115.8 points, 44.3 rebounds, 25.6 assists, 6.5 steals and 4.6 blocks per game while shooting 49.4% from the field. Their opponents have averaged 111.2 points on 46.1% shooting.INJURIES: Jazz: Udoka Azubuike: out (ankle).Nets: Alize Johnson: out (not with team), Spencer Dinwiddie: out for season (acl), Landry Shamet: out (ankle), Kyrie Irving: out (personal), Kevin Durant: out (hamstring). March 24, 2021 /Sports News – Local Utah puts home win streak on the line against Brooklyn Written bycenter_img Associated Presslast_img read more


first_imgArcata >> Davasyia Hagger scored a game-high 26 points as the Humboldt State men’s basketball team defeated Simpson University 84-74 on Tuesday at Lumberjack Arena.Leading by one point at the half, HSU (3-3 overall, 0-1 California Collegiate Athletic Association) opened the second half on an 11-4 run capped by five-straight points from Tyras Rattler Jr. to take a 50-44 lead.Later in the half, HSU extended its lead to its largest of the game at 19 points on a Jack Kaub 3-pointer with just …last_img read more


first_imgScientists want to copy animal skills.  The new science of biomimetics is on a roll (11/30/2010), looking to living things for design inspiration.  Here are a few of the latest organisms giving inventors and engineers goose bumps.Bird gloss:  Ravens have what scientists at the University of Akron in Ohio want: glossy materials.  Nevermore shall ravens be despised members of the bird order; according to PhysOrg, their feathers have thin layers that cause light interference, producing a sheen that glistens even though the surface is rough.  That could be useful to inventors needing a glossy look for materials that cannot be polished.Honeybee aerobatics:  By imitating the optical flow of honeybee eyes, researchers at the University of Queensland are inventing plane navigation systems that can perform complex maneuvers, PhysOrg reported.Fly navigation:  With help from the Air Force, Caltech scientists, similarly, are studying fly vision to learn better flight attitude control.  It would be enough to improve flight stabilization and navigation from our tiny winged neighbors; “However, with a tiny brain they are able to perform a variety of tasks such as finding food and mates despite changing light levels, wind gusts, wing damage, and so on.”Bird-o-soar:  Soaring is better than flapping, reported PhysOrg.  Researchers at Hebrew University of Jerusalem are equipping birds with transmitters to learn more about their flight efficiency.  They are finding that small birds benefit from gliding as much as large birds.Bacterial biofuel:  A subset of biomimetics is employing organisms directly.  Science Daily said that scientists at Concordia University are trying to engineer Lactobacillus lactis, the organism that helps make cheese from milk, into a workhorse “to transform plant material into biofuels or other chemicals.”Bacterial sensors:  Scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution are recruiting bacteria to test water quality.  According to Science Daily, their “revolutionary Swimming Behavioral Spectrophotometer (SBS) … employs one-celled protozoa to detect toxins in water sources.”  The contraption, which monitors the swimming ability of the germs as indicators of water quality, could some day monitor all the drinking water in the world, with instantaneous feedback and continuous response.  The Department of Defense is very interested. Butterfly medic:  “Butterfly-Inspired Patch May Alert Soldiers to Brain Injury” reads a headline on Live Science, describing how “A color-changing patch modeled after the iridescent wings of butterflies could give soldiers a heads-up on the severity of injuries sustained on the battlefield,” thanks to work at the University of Pennsylvania.Silk drop control:  Remember how spider webs collect dew by causing water droplets to bead up due to the nature of the proteins in the silk? (see 02/04/2010).  Nature reported that Chinese scientists are trying to imitate this trick with synthetic silks.Earthworm biohazard sensors:  Why build electronic sensors to detect hazmat (hazardous materials), when earthworms can be hired to do it?  Science Daily reported that researchers in Venezuela and Argentina are studying the “viability of using earthworms to process hazardous material containing high concentrations of heavy metal for the bioremediation of old industrial sites, landfill and other potentially hazardous areas.”  This offers an “alternative to complex and costly industrial cleanup methods, the team suggests.”Neuron computers:  Live Science reported how researchers at Boston University are bringing the world closer to silicon-free computers that use memristors, which “behave like neurons in many ways,” toward new digital brains.Bacterial computers:  Imagine being able to program bacteria to act as logic circuits for organic computers.  That’s what researchers at the University of California at San Francisco are counting on, according to Science Daily.Ant computers:  How do ants solve puzzles so well?  They can always find the shortest route to a target, even when a barrier is put in the way.  Scientists at the University of Sydney are curious, so they have built mazes to learn how the “humble ant is capable of solving difficult mathematical problems.”  The headline reads, “Next generation of algorithms inspired by problem-solving ants.”  Supercomputer programmers who humble themselves like the ant might learn how to adapt to changing conditions and barriers, both by exploratory behavior and signals left in the path, such as the pheromone molecules that help ants remember previous trials without backtracking.  One team member commented, “Even simple mass-recruiting ants have much more complex and labile problem solving skills than we ever thought.”Viral batteries:  “Viruses have a bad rep–and rightly so,” began an article on PhysOrg, but researchers at the University of Maryland are “turning the tables, harnessing and exploiting the ‘self-renewing’ and ‘self-assembling’properties of viruses for a higher purpose: to build a new generation of small, powerful and highly efficient batteries and fuel cells.”Starfish medical breakthrough:  Watch a video at BBC News to learn how asthma, hay fever and arthritis may get new effective treatments, thanks to starfish.  Imitating the slimy goo on starfish surfaces could help reduce inflammation on blood vessels, researchers at King’s College London said.  “The starfish have effectively done a lot of the hard work for us.”    This is just one example of promises from sea creatures.  The article said that scientists envision an “underwater pharmacy” of useful medical products coming from organisms as diverse as sea cucumbers and seaweed.  “Some of the most widespread, widely used medicines come from nature,” said David Hughes, an ecologist from the Scottish Association for Marine Science.  “Penicillin is a mould that grows on bread, aspirin comes from willow trees, so it’s not too surprising turning to nature to find useful drugs.  But we’ve only very recently begun to look to the sea for a useful source of medicines.”  The huge diversity of life in the oceans that cover nearly 3/4 of the earth’s surface promises a vast research area for years to come.Bones and cones:  From the spiral cones of molluscs to the bones and teeth of vertebrates, biominerals form a variety of lightweight yet tough materials.  Science Daily discussed how researchers at the Ohio Supercomputer Center are studying “nature’s ability to form complex structures, such as bones, teeth and mollusk shells, from peptides.”  This could lead to breakthroughs in “bone replacement, sensing systems, efficient energy generation and treatment of diseases.”Very few of these articles mentioned evolution.  Of those that did, evolution was a side dish, not the entree.  In the raven feather article (bullet 1 above), for instance, the suggestion was made that the peculiar feather structure “may represent an evolutionarily intermediate step between matte and iridescent colors,” and in the starfish story (bullet 14), Clive Page at King’s College London injected purpose and design into a Darwinian answer by saying, “The starfish is effectively providing us with something that is giving is different leads: it has had billions of years in evolution to come up with molecules that do specific things.”Go biomimetics!  The biomimicry revolution is making science fun again.  Reporters and scientists who are tired of Darwin, this is a way for you to get out of the kingdom of the DODOs (Darwin only, Darwin only) without jeopardizing your career.  Just study the living subject and apply it to real world problems.  Storytelling about “billions of years in evolution” is superfluous and will not be missed.    Parents and teachers: consider inspiring your precocious students’ next science project with biomimetics.  It could be a first-prize winner and open up a young person’s mind to an exciting, productive career that could improve human life and health without harming the environment.(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest  Since she was a teenager some 60 years ago, Gail Dunlap has played an active role in her family’s seventh generation Ohio farming operation by focusing on ways to continually improve conservation practices and establish a natural and sustainable way of life.“Back then, we were not that many years past the Dust Bowl times and farmers in the area were doing a wonderful job of resting the soil with long rotations,” said Dunlap. “I remember even the weeds seemed to be as beautiful as wildflowers.”However, as the years passed, Dunlap quickly became more concerned about soil erosion issues in the area. Each time she returned home from college she noticed that more land was being tilled and islands of oak trees within the fields were disappearing.In 1985, Dunlap learned about a new Farm Bill program called the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and was excited about how the program could benefit their farms. Her parents agreed. After talking with their local USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) staff, they discovered that an entire farm could be eligible for the program.CRP is one of the largest private lands programs for conservation used extensively throughout the country to reduce soil erosion, improve water and air quality and provide wildlife habitat.Today, the original Dunlap farm fosters multiple CRP practices, including wetland restoration, timber, prairies, buffer strips, riparian buffers, grass waterways, shallow water areas, tall grass prairies and various wildlife habitat and food plots. Dunlap has dedicated more than 220 acres of her land in Pickaway and Ross counties to conservation.CRP is a voluntary program that allows eligible landowners to receive annual rental payments and cost-share assistance to establish long-term, resource-conserving covers on eligible farmland throughout the duration of their 10-to-15-year contracts.“CRP is a blessing and it has helped me save our family farm by preserving the land and establishing wildlife habitat,” Dunlap said. “This program gave me hope that I would be able to restore my land through conservation practices so I could bring back diverse wildlife and have the opportunity to plant trees again.”Over the years, Dunlap’s CRP practices did indeed expand. Besides improving the soil health, Dunlap noticed an increase in wildlife numbers. It restored diversity to the farm.“The program provided me income and the opportunity to apply restorative methods to save my land and allow wildlife species to return, reproduce and thrive,” said Dunlap. “It has brought back beauty to the landscape, improved soil fertility and created new ecosystems that will continue to improve over the years. The impact of CRP will benefit many future generations.”Since 1985, CRP has helped prevent more than 9 billion tons of soil from eroding and protected more than 170,000 stream miles with riparian and grass buffers, more than 100,000 acres of bottomland hardwood trees, nearly 300,000 acres of flood-plain wetlands, and 250,000 acres each for duck nesting habitat and upland bird habitat.last_img read more


first_imgSahil had a bad reputation in school. At the age of 14 he had already been suspended three times for various reasons ranging from smoking, bunking school and being rude to his teachers. Most teachers had given up on him and the staff room chit-chat was spiced up with Sahil’s latest antics. When he reached class 9, Neha, his young new teacher was warned by her colleagues to keep him in check. Everyone was surprised: Neha did not seem to be keeling under pressure with Sahil in her class. In fact, she couldn’t stop talking about how bright and talented he was. And as for Sahil, he seemed to be going through a gradual transformation.Instead of the surly, angry, disrespectful Sahil, the school saw a happier, brighter, confi-dent young man who seemed to be full of life! He was taking great interest in academics and focussing his energy in excelling in his passion-football. If you are wondering what made such a turn-around possible then there is a simple answer: mentoring!So what is mentoring exactly? Mentoring is a life changing connection that can open the window to a new world of optimism and hope. Where doubt can turn into possibility and possibility into passion. It is tragic that most teachers tend to limit themselves to just teaching chemistry, physics, mathematics when they could actually be mentoring their students and enriching them for life.Sir Ken Robinson, the revolutionary educationist describes the four roles of a mentor (The Element, Penguin 2009) as follows.Mentors recognise Mentors are able to see ability and gift in each child. Be it sports, academics, theatre, music, dance, interpersonal skills, poetry, leadership qualities, or any other thing. They notice the smallest of details. They go beyond the facade children present sometimes and see what makes them truly special.Mentors encourageRather than going down the beaten path of “let’s work on your weaknesses”, they believe in highlighting, nurturing and showcasing the child’s strengths. So the artistic child gets to decorate the board, the drama queen gets to organise a skit and the high-energy child is given the responsibility of managing all class events.Mentors FacilitateHave you ever seen the Canadian game of Curling? In this game, heavy blocks of granite are pushed on ice. The team which manages to take its stone to the target first is the winner. The sweepers, who with immense skill and strategy facilitate the speed and direction of the stone by clearing the pathway with their brooms, are the most fascinating part of the game. Mentors are like sweepers in Curling who can facilitate the blossoming of every child with their magical brooms! They have the knack of sweeping away feelings of self-doubt, low self-worth and confusion with similar skill and determination.Mentors stretch and nudge. They get directly involved in the children’s lives. From making time for the child, listening, connecting with the parents, they go beyond the typical role of a teacher. They gently nudge the child to go the extra mile. From getting the math whiz in the class to enroll in Math Olympiad, to making the shy orator shine on stage, they encourage children to take risks, be comfortable with failures and then try again. And behind it all, there’s a deep faith in the ability of each child.I like to think that a true mentor is like a prism. She captures the light in each child and turns it into a brilliant rainbow. That is the power of mentoring!advertisementlast_img read more