Month: June 2021


first_imgDropkick the hangover – Ahuriri EstuaryThis walking track is on Humber Street, off Pandora Road. This estuary supports an interdependent community of wading birds, fish, mud dwellers and aquatic plant life. The Ahuriri Wildlife Refuge is an important feeding and resting areas for over 70 species of resident and migratory wading birds from arctic breeding grounds. Take your binoculars. NAPIERPre-match jaunt – Cape Kidnappers LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Spectacular geological cliff formations on the coast to Cape Kidnappers Gannet colony makes a trip there memorable. The Saddle and Black Reef gannet colonies are closed to public access but the Black Reef colony can be viewed from the beach. The Plateau colony is the main place for viewing the nesting gannets where there are also good panoramic views from this elevated headland.last_img read more


first_imgFRANCE TEAM TO PLAY ENGLAND, SUNDAY 11 MARCH, STADE DE FRANCE LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS NOT FOR FEATURED New man at ten: Lionel Beauxis missed two drop-goal attempts against Ireland but will start at fly-half on SundayFRANCE COACH Philippe Saint-Andre has dropped half-backs Morgan Parra and Francois Trinh-Duc to the bench for their RBS 6 Nations game against England on Sunday.Toulouse fly-half Lionel Beauxis comes in for Trinh-Duc while former Leicester scrum-half Julien Dupuy, who now plays for Stade Francais, will don the No 9 jersey at Stade de France.He’s back: Dupuy makes a first start since 2009Neither Beauxis nor Dupuy have started a Test since 2009, but Saint-Andre is backing them to deliver a win against England and maintain France’s Six Nations title bid after their 17-17 draw with Ireland on Sunday.“We can still win the tournament,” said Saint-Andre. “We will get together to produce a big performance against England. We will look to be a bit more tactically astute.” Clement Poitrenaud; Vincent Clerc, Aurelien Rougerie, Wesley Fofana, Julien Malzieu; Lionel Beauxis, Julien Dupuy; Jean-Baptiste Poux, Dimitri Szarzewski, Nicolas Mas, Pascal Pape, Yoann Maestri,Thierry Dusautoir (captain), Julien Bonnaire, Imanol Harinordoquy.Replacements: William Servat, Vincent Debaty, Lionel Nallet, Louis Picamoles, Morgan Parra, Francois Trinh-Duc, Maxime Mermoz.last_img read more


first_imgSadly, the worst of this is yet to come. Although RFU chief executive Ian Ritchie has promised to “bust a gut” to guide English clubs into a pan-European tournament next season, there are plenty of obstacles in his way. For one, mutual loathing between the Welsh Rugby Union and the regions – a separate issue but certainly one concerning the Heineken Cup – might end up in court. Truly, the sorry saga has showcased everything ugly about professional rugby.Rigid windowsBetween a fine of £60,000 for Northampton allowing George North back to Cardiff and the impending sham that will be the first Test between New Zealand and an understrength England this June, the IRB’s international window needs a re-think.Barefaced media bluffingIrresistible riches across The Channel means Top 14 transfer speculation will continue. That said, it would be nice if coaches were as blunt and honest as Richard Cockerill on the subject. A day after Toby Flood tweeted to say he hadn’t made a decision on his future, the Leicester boss refused to maintain the charade.“Toby rang me on Thursday to say he will not be with us next season,” he told BT Sport. “We move on.”French fancy: Flood is definitely off for Top 14Contrast that with the approach of Bath’s Toby Booth, owner of the stoniest poker face in the Premiership. His words on George Ford back in January now look laughable: “We are disappointed by the speculation. His father, Mike [Bath defensive coach] should know and he hasn’t signed with us because he wants to stay at Leicester – George is categorical about that. And that is direct from Mike.” Guess what happened next.Passable forward passesLaw 12 doesn’t leave much room for ambiguity – “A forward pass occurs when a player passes the ball forward. ‘Forward’ means towards the opposing team’s dead-ball line.”But factor in the notion of relative velocity. Suddenly you need a physics degree and five minutes with the TMO to make a call. Then sometimes a supporting player is allowed to run onto the ball having been flat with the passer, all because there was a hint of ‘backwards hands’. Let’s give sovereignty back to the referees and trust their eyes rather than twiddle our thumbs.Calls for a Lions quotaSelection debates are a delicious part of Lions tradition. With that in mind, most of the consternation surrounding O’Driscoll’s axing for the series finale was both expected and acceptable.However, when people still rubbished the decision after a first victorious tour in 16 years and suggested a quota of players per nation, we entered the realms of the ridiculous. Warren Gatland is often (fairly) criticised for picking on reputation, but this time he knew sentimentality was no substitute for winning. Thank goodness for that. Irresponsible: One of 2013’s lowlights was when a concussed George Smith re-took the field against the LionsBy Charlie MorganLeave festive cheer a minute and embrace your inner Ebenezer Scrooge. Although 2013 provided plenty to celebrate, some aspects of the game were grating. Here is a selection of lowlights.Rucking worriesNot a man on his feet: This horrible ruck is at the Top 14 finalMy opening moan surrounds the breakdown, still a manic battleground shrouded in uncertainty. I believe a vicious cycle that jeopardises player safety has been triggered.Firstly, the concept of supporting bodyweight isn’t properly policed. Nobody should be able to slow possession, let alone win a penalty, with their forearms resting on the ground. However, they have been allowed to – directly bringing about a more sinister issue.Clearing out is now carnage, attackers often plunging off their feet into a pile of bodies. Nobody wants physicality to be compromised, but players propelling themselves at prone opponents like crazed porpoises is an injury epidemic waiting to happen.Concussion careThe sight of Brian O’Driscoll tottering around the pitch against France last March was sickening. So was George Smith’s re-entry to the deciding Lions Test after being reduced to a jelly-legged mess by Richard Hibbard’s granite noggin. Thankfully, these high-profile blunders have brought about heightened awareness and tweaks to IRB protocol. Still, it is too perpetual an issue to ever neglect again.Poor pitchesAllianz Park and Cardiff Arms have produced some enthralling encounters this season in abysmal conditions – think back to the Blues’ gritty, rain-soaked Heineken Cup defeat of Toulon in October or Saracens’ dismantling of Leicester a fortnight ago amid a monsoon. On both occasions, artificial surfaces stayed firm to give the best chance of fluency. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said of other grounds.Murrayfield is still cutting up after the autumn and the Millennium Stadium’s turf, a repeat offender, has sunk to farcically low standards. A £3.3 million redevelopment this summer cannot come soon enough. During Les Bleus’ clash with South Africa, the Stade de France was appalling too. Besides anything else, scrums become a perilous shambles. Which leads us onto the next grumble…Not many messes like this: but scrums still eat up timeTime-sapping scrummagingThe first 40 minutes of Wales’ eventual defeat to Australia in Cardiff was among the most exhilarating halves of 2013. But when half-time arrived, something was missing – a breathless period of play had seen precisely zero scrums. Even the most die-hard front-row fans weren’t complaining.Overall, the law trials are working. A new sequence has brought about more stability and rewarded dominant packs. The nauseating “yes, nine” call will probably be phased out and consistent refereeing of the feed has been promised. But frustrating delays remain. Set pieces can take over two minutes to complete, even without re-sets. Add this to a heavy reliance on television match officials (more later) and there are lulls in action. Loyal spectators are getting bored and newcomers are being put off. It’s tough to blame them.The European mess LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The second half of Wales vs. TongaSelf-explanatory really – this was quite simply the most turgid, error-saturated passage of rugby this year. Best banish it from memory. <> at Welford Road on December 8, 2013 in Leicester, England. last_img read more


first_img Touchdown: Kyle Eastmond scores for Bath against Leicester Tigers in the Aviva PremiershipKyle Eastmond didn’t make it into the latest Opta Team of the Week, but there was plenty of love for him on BT Sport’s Rugby Tonight show.“He’s the most balanced runner in the Premiership,” said Ugo Monye. “As a winger, having a 12 who can distribute the ball as well as he can, whether it’s kicking, passing or taking it to the line, is an absolute nightmare (to defend against).”It was a timely endorsement of the Bath centre’s talents ahead of the EPS announcement on 22 October. Some very good players are going to miss out on England selection and Eastmond finds himself not only competing against a battery of strong (and bigger) midfield contenders but also trying to shrug off the baggage of England’s previous outing in Hamilton, when he was replaced at half-time after the All Blacks made seven line breaks and scored four tries.It would be a travesty if Eastmond was discarded on the basis of that ropey 40 minutes, not least because the gaps that appeared in the English midfield owed more to a collective failure, with New Zealand’s ‘catch-and-drive’ sucking in loose forwards and exposing backs to one-on-one tackles.Fancy footworkBetter by far to remember the first Test of that series, when Eastmond showed the speed of foot, speed of hand and, above all, speed of thought that few in world rugby currently possess.Eastmond’s footwork in traffic against Northampton Saints last weekend, followed by a perfectly weighted pass, was rightly lauded – see the clip below.But we’d seen similar skill on the Test stage last June in Auckland, when he stepped inside both Ma’a Nonu and Aaron Cruden within five strides.In that same match he showed his touch on the pass when putting Manu Tuilagi between the All Black centres, and his ability to play first receiver was also demonstrated, such as when he filled in on the blind side and put Israel Dagg under pressure with a well-judged kick. Naturally, the best teams can do both, and in Eastmond England have a player whose trickery would complement a more physical ball-carrier outside him.The 25-year-old Lancastrian has three club games – against Saracens, Wasps and Glasgow Warriors – in which to book his slot in the EPS. England then have 12 Tests to fine-tune their team by the World Cup, starting next month when the Big Three and Samoa visit Twickenham. They should ensure Eastmond is part of the ride. Eastmond’s ‘unseen’ work was also of the highest order: he forced a turnover scrum with a choke tackle on Dagg, created another turnover when anticipating the wrap-around and enveloping Conrad Smith, and took advantage of his small stature (5ft 7in) to get low over the ball at the ruck. He even cleaned out Richie McCaw.Such details matter hugely, of course, because World Cups are always won by fine margins.Balanced pairingSo, should Eastmond be starting for England? If only there was an easy answer. It’s unthinkable that Tuilagi won’t fill one of the berths. But with Billy Twelvetrees proving inconsistent in his dozen starts, and a Tuilagi-Luther Burrell pairing unlikely to provide enough finesse, Eastmond’s chances of reprising his Auckland partnership with Tuilagi are not to be sniffed at.A Tuilagi-Jonathan Joseph axis, as tried twice in South Africa and with Tuilagi playing at 12, would surely flounder on the back of Tuilagi’s limited distribution skills. Brad Barritt has started exactly half of Stuart Lancaster’s 30 Tests but might be regarded as a retrogressive selection.Fine start: Henry Slade has impressed in the Aviva Premiership so far with Exeter ChiefsThere are two potential bolters, Henry Slade and the soon-to-arrive Sam Burgess. Of the two, Slade is the likelier choice; he has a cool head, passes beautifully off both hands, and can defend solidly if unspectacularly. He kicks exquisitely from hand and off the tee, and offers a left-foot kicking option – not to be underestimated. On current progress, he’s a shoo-in for England at Japan 2019 but is England 2015 too soon for him?Josh Lewsey and Trevor Woodman broke into England’s 2003 World Cup-winning team late in the day, but they played at full-back and prop. The current England is still deciding on a fundamental – are we going to smash the door down or unpick the lock? Unfairly castigated following England’s rout in Hamilton, the Bath centre is in blistering form and deserves a shot at the 12 shirt for the autumn Testscenter_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Highlight last_img read more


first_img Referee Craig Evans had more than the game to worry about, during the New Zealand Sevens Tournament (Photo by Kevin Barnes – CameraSport via Getty Images) The New Zealand Sevens Tournament was being held in Hamilton for the first time in 18 years after relocating from Wellington, and it was a pulsating tournament with Fiji emerging as the victors against South Africa in the final.The home team, New Zealand, fell at the semi-final stage to the eventual winners, and lost out to Australia in the bronze medal match. Rugby referees have enough to deal with, controlling the match and making sure the rules of the game are enforced. But it appears there is another concern to worry about: attacks at speed from below knee height.Professional referee Craig Evans was minding his own business during the New Zealand Rugby Sevens Tournament in Hamilton, when a remote controlled car, of the type that normally carry kicking tees, veered towards him and drove straight into his leg.Evans took the collision well, barely flinching and joking later in a tweet that the Rugby Sevens organising body may get an injury at work claim coming their way soon.It’s unlikely that World Rugby has the lawyers on standby, but it was a great response to a really funny moment.It is a good thing this wasn’t football, otherwise he probably would have collapsed to the turf, clutching his leg, never to referee again. South Africa now top the overall standings in the World Sevens Series, with New Zealand in second and Fiji third. England are the best-placed of the European nations, in sixth position.Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Twitter and Facebook. Craig Evans shows a great sense of humour after his ankle takes a bash from a rogue vehiclelast_img read more


first_img All Black Ardie Savea has feared of going… Seeing Triple: The Barrett brothers will make All Black history against Canada (Getty Images) “Yeah, they’re very proud. Dad’s back home checking the weather forecast, wherever we are. They’re very excited. Dad’s coming over at a certain stage and bringing a little tour party with him. It’ll be great to see him. Mum’s happy to stay home and watch on TV so it’s a hugely proud moment for our family.”Younger brother Scott said; “I never really thought we would be here. In the backyard, you would sort of joke and say, ‘He’s got a kick to win it – the World Cup.’ You’d create scenarios like that. You’d joke about it – and you pinch yourself that we’re here right now.” Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Winners of the past two World Cups, the… Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Barrett Brothers To Make All Black History Against CanadaIf he comes off the bench against Canada, Ardie Savea will become the first player to play at the Rugby World Cup wearing goggles, but this is not the only piece of history to be made when New Zealand go up against Canada in their second Group B match.Beauden, Jordie and Scott Barrett are set to become the first trio of brothers to start for the All Blacks during the Rugby World Cup, and the second trio ever to do so. The first were Tonga’s Fe’ao, Elisi and Manu Vunipola against Scotland in 1995.Beauden said of the moment; “It’s great. As siblings as you grow older, I guess you sort of go your own ways but it’s an awesome time for us to connect on tour all together and all to be living the dream that we all once had to play for the All Blacks. And there’s no better place than the World Cup.” 2019 Rugby World Cup: New Zealand 63-0 Canada Expand Beuaden, Scott and Jordie are all set to start in the match against Canada. Canada were one of the last teams into… Expand Expand All Black Ardie Savea to wear goggles against Canada New Zealand Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide 2019 Rugby World Cup: New Zealand 63-0 Canada New Zealand Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide The last team to qualify for the tournament,… Canada Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide Canada Rugby World Cup Fixtures, Squad, Group, Guide LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Collapse All Black Ardie Savea to wear goggles against Canadalast_img read more


first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Get into gear: match-day merchandise from the Wales-Italy match at the start of the year (Inpho) There’s pride and a finishing place on the line in Llanelli today – don’t miss the action How to watch Wales v Italy from outside your countryIf you’re abroad but still want to watch your local Autumn Nations Cup coverage, like Wales v Italy, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address, so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Autumn Nations Cup live stream that you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPNs and recommend ExpressVPN. It’s easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPNWales v Italy live stream: How to watch from the UKAmazon Prime Video are the main rights holders for the Autumn Nations Cup in the UK and will show Wales v Italy (kick-off 4.45pm) live.If you’re an Amazon Prime member, coverage is included in your package. If you’re not an Amazon Prime member, it costs £7.99 a month and you can cancel at any time. Plus, if you’ve never signed up before, there is currently a 30-day FREE trial.Sign up to Amazon PrimeThe Prime Video app allows you to watch games on your TV, mobile, game console and more. Find out what devices you can watch Prime Video on here.Free-to-air Welsh language channel S4C also has live coverage of Wales v Italy (kick-off 4.45pm). In Wales, you’ll find S4C on Sky channel 104, Freeview 4, Virgin TV 166 and Freesat 104. In the rest of the UK, it’s Sky channel 134, Freesat 120 and Virgin TV 166.If you’re from the UK but are overseas when Wales v Italy takes place, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above.Wales v Italy live stream: How to watch from IrelandPremier Sports will broadcast Wales v Italy (kick-off 4.45pm) for Irish viewers. If you have a Sky contract, Premier Sports is part of the broadcaster’s ‘Sports Extra’ package. It costs €10 a month for the first six months and €20 a month after that for Sky Sports customers (€17 and €34 for non-Sky Sports customers).You can also access Premier Sports via a Now TV day or month pass, which allows you to watch sports channels without committing to a long-term contract.Get a Now TV PassWales v Italy live stream: How to watch from the USAIf you live in the States, FloSports have the exclusive rights to show every Autumn Nations Cup match live. You can stream Wales v Italy (kick-off 11.45am EST and 8.45am on the West coast) via FloSports or watch via the app.A FloRugby monthly subscription costs $29.99 and the annual subscription is $150. Both packages give you access to the entire FloSports network, which includes coverage of cycling, motorsport and American Football.Sign up to FloRugbyWales v Italy live stream: How to watch from AustraliaFor those in Australia, beIN Sports has the rights to show Autumn Nations Cup matches, with Wales v Italy kicking off at 3.45am.Access to beIN Sports’ Connect package is $19.99 a month or $179.99 for a year and includes lots of European football action.You can also stream beIN Sports’ coverage live and on-demand through Kayo Sports. A basic package is $25 a month and premium is $35 a month – and they are offering a FREE 14-day trial to new customers.Kayo Sports offerWales v Italy live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIf you want to tune in to the Autumn Nations Cup from the Land of the Long White Cloud, Sky Sport NZ have the rights. Wales v Italy kicks off at 5.45am, with coverage on Sky Sport NZ 1.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99). However, if you sign up for 12 months before 31 January you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offerWales v Italy live stream: How to watch from South AfricaIf you want to watch the Autumn Nations Cup from South Africa, SuperSport is the place to go. Wales v Italy is on SuperSport Action (kick-off 6.45pm).There are various DStv packages giving access to SuperSport. They range from Access, which has the Blitz and Variety 4 channels, to Premium, which includes all 18 sports channels.Wales v Italy live stream: How to watch from AsiaPremier Sports has the rights to broadcast Autumn Nations Cup matches, like Wales v Italy, in Asia and will show matches in Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Laos, Macau, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.A weekly pass to Premier Sports Asia is $19.99 or you can take out a rolling six-month contract for $59.99.Premier Sports Asia subscriptionWe recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing.  Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Wales v Italy live stream: How to watch the Autumn Nations Cup matchWales and Italy meet in the Autumn Nations Cup fifth-sixth play-off today at Parc y Scarlets (4.45pm). The teams reached this stage after finishing third in their respective pools.Wales beat Georgia but lost to Ireland and England, while Italy lost to Scotland and France but were awarded a 28-0 win against Fiji in a match that wasn’t able to take place.“I will be glad to get 2020 over and done with,” said Liam Williams, who returns at full-back for Wales after injury. “Hopefully 2021 is a better year and we can go into the Six Nations with some confidence after beating Italy.”You can read our full Wales v Italy preview here. Below we explain how to find a reliable live stream for the match wherever you are…last_img read more


first_imgAhead of La Rochelle v Toulouse, here’s a look at which battles will dictate the winner of Europe’s biggest club competition Antoine Dupont scores against Bordeaux-Bègles to send Toulouse into the Champions Cup final (AFP/Getty Images) Four Key European Champions Cup Final 2021 Match-upsThe climax of the 2020-21 European Champions Cup season will see the first all-French final since Toulon beat Clermont Auvergne back in 2015.It only takes four hours to drive from La Rochelle, on the Atlantic coast, to Toulouse, adorning the banks of the Garonne – but both teams will decamp to Twickenham to meet in European rugby’s blue-riband event on Saturday afternoon.Set to be a marquee clash, the two teams currently sit at the summit of the Top 14. Ugo Mola’s Toulouse make up the flesh of the national team, while La Rochelle, coached by Jono Gibbes and Ronan O’Gara, are a side brimming with beauty and brutality.Toulouse are bidding to win their fifth title, which would lift them above Leinster to become the most decorated team in European history, while La Rochelle are gunning for their first.There are game-breakers littered all over the field, so here’s at look at a few of the battles that could be decisive.Four Key European Champions Cup Final 2021 Match-upsAntoine Dupont v Tawera Kerr-Barlow Toulouse scrum-half Antoine Dupont is the northern hemisphere’s outstanding player. Simply put, if he is allowed free reign, it is hard to conceive of a La Rochelle victory.Always a brilliant running threat, Dupont’s support lines are generational, while his game management and kicking game are rapidly developing. Greatest Champions Cup Final Tries Could Toulouse’s new generation transform the fortunes of… Twin Peaks: Meet Richie and Rory Arnold Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Greatest Champions Cup Final Tries Expand LIFE AT the sugar mill was, well, pretty… However, La Rochelle have their own weapon in the position – former All Blacks scrum-half Tawera Kerr-Barlow, in his third season at the club. Out-half Ihaia West is more of a free-spirited ten, leaving Kerr-Barlow to hold the primary territorial responsibility.His kicking is one area where his game might shade Dupont’s, while he also possesses the size to make a real nuisance of himself in defence. Watch for his tempo, too; he’s the tap through which the La Rochelle back-line flows.Will Skelton v the Arnold brothers In the semi-final against Leinster, 6ft 8in lock Will Skelton put in one of the great Champions Cup performances – metaphorically and literally head-and-shoulders above anyone else.His impact on La Rochelle’s pack is sizable, providing scrummaging stability as well as hoovering up midfield carries – allowing slightly smaller No 8 Grégroy Alldritt to stay in his favoured wide channels.James Ryan and Devin Toner couldn’t cope with him in the semi-final, which has been mooted as a possible reason why the former didn’t make the Lions 2021 touring party.center_img Collapse Greatest Champions Cup Final Tries The European Champions… Toulouse trio Antoine Dupont, Romain Ntamack and Thomas Ramos Tasked with stopping the human glacier are two fellow Australians – Richie and Rory Arnold, 30-year-old identical twins from Wagga Wagga, New South Wales. Even taller than Skelton at 6ft 10in apiece, they are touching 40st between them.La Rochelle’s attack relies on front-foot ball – and the Arnold twins will be positioned over the sponsor’s logo in the centre of the field, soaking and slowing Skelton’s carries.Toulouse’s semi-final against Bordeaux-Begles devolved into an arm-wrestle, in which the Arnold brothers’ ability to slowly turn opposition carriers into ground beef should prove incredibly useful.MORE EUROPEAN RUGBY FEATURES Up against him will be another Springbok – current all-galaxy winger Cheslin Kolbe. Toulouse rely on giving him the ball early and giving him time to work out a method of embarrassing the opposition winger, whereas La Rochelle prefer to wait until the defence is already warped before unleashing Rhule.Kolbe is possibly even more talismanic for Toulouse than he is for South Africa. Often playing fly-half for them this season, he rotates with Romain Ntamack, Zack Holmes and Thomas Ramos to provide a first-receiver option – watch out for this at Twickenham.Rhule holds a significant size advantage over his opposite number. While Kolbe’s tackling has never been a weakness, height can be key in the aerial battle – and Ihaia West does love a cross-kick…Uini Atonio v Cyril Baille Finals are usually won in the trenches – and the 2021 Champions Cup final will likely be no different. Toulouse loosehead Cyril Baille was one of France’s outstanding players in the Six Nations and has a ball-handling skill-set akin to Mako Vunipola and Kyle Sinckler.Cyril Baille playing for France against Italy in the 2021 Six Nations (Getty Images)He decimated Lions call-up Zander Fagerson in France’s recent clash with Scotland, but Saturday will see him face an immovable object in the shape of Uini Atonio. The giant La Rochelle tighthead clocks in at 6ft 5½in and 24st – that’s the same weight as a fully-grown giant panda.Most of the attention is on La Rochelle’s flowing back-line, but with Atonio backed up by Skelton the scrum is their first weapon.La Rochelle v Toulouse, Twickenham, Saturday 22 May 2021, 4.45pm, Live on BT Sport 2. Toulouse trio Antoine Dupont, Romain Ntamack and Thomas Ramos Twin Peaks: Meet Richie and Rory Arnold Raymond Rhule v Cheslin Kolbe Levani Botia may well be La Rochelle’s most talented attacker, but their key weapon in the Champions Cup has been left-winger Raymond Rhule. He’s quick, strong and in possession of a dummy dirtier than the Gobi Desert. Just ask the Sale Sharks, who he tore apart in the quarter-final. Expandlast_img read more


first_img‘Abundant hope’ is possible amid climate despair Conference calls churches, scientist to find new ways to work together By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted May 2, 2013 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York May 6, 2013 at 1:29 pm I am in wholehearted agreement with Jeffrey Parker. The Bishop’s has made repeated attacks on the “heresy” of imagining we have an individual relation to God. (By the way, Bishop, I am a heretic. I await your excommunication). But let’s turn from theology to politics. The Bishop thinks galvanizing the entire church against the use of fossil fuels will be a politically effective instrument. Really? Does she really believe that Exxon and Saudi Arabia will retreat in defeat when they hear the voice of “our” collective righteousness? Seriously, when choruses of disapproval coming from the left wing of mainline Protestantism have had the tiniest effect on any major policy? I need a concrete example. Anything will do. Traffic tickets? The bottle laws? Whether politically effective or ineffective, The Bishop loves to talk about “our” guilt. One participant above allows that merely making people feel guilty is not enough: they must be motivated both by guilt and (among other things) fear. “We” are guilty because we own a car, or heat our house, or turn on the lights in our living room. Are the people here correct in suggesting that everyone on the planet who uses fossil fuels is a sinner? Or is the problem merely that we fail to mouth the correct political sentiments? While pondering this insoluble problem, I would like to hear the Presiding Bishop explain why “individualism” makes us evil, even “demonic.” I assume it has something to do with her embrace of an ideology of collective guilt and “our” involvement in evils that extend far beyond our wicked use of petroleum. The church is working 24/7, dispensing wholesale collective guilt over a wide array of human conditions: sexuality, gender, race, and nationality. Individualism? Collectivism? By using the rhetorical device of “our” guilt, the Bishop leaves most of “us” mere individuals pretty much screwed coming and going. As individualists we are guilty. Why? Because we fail to see the vastly diverse array of “our” often unforgivable collective guilt. Guilt here, guilt there, guilt everywhere. So much for forgiveness. So much for Christianity. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments (3) Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Albany, NY Stephen Koch says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Barbara Fukumoto says: Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Evangelical Lutheran Church in America Presiding Bishop Mark Hanson (left), Church of Sweden Archbishop Anders Wejryd and Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori show off the statement pledging concerted environmental action that they signed during the May1-2 “Sustaining hope in the face of climate change” gathering in Washington, D.C., sponsored by the Episcopal Church and the Church of Sweden. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceEditors’ note: Story updated May 10 to add link at end of story to just-released video of May 2 sessions.[Episcopal News Service – Washington, D.C.] The Episcopal Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the Church of Sweden (Lutheran) committed during a climate change conference here to “leading a conversion of epic scale, a metanoia, or communal spiritual movement away from sin and despair toward the renewal and healing of all creation.”“We commit to being the voice and hands that will witness to the Gospel of Jesus Christ and build the moral and political will that prompts action from our elected leaders,” Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America Presiding Bishop Mark Hanson and Church of Sweden Archbishop Anders Wejryd said in a joint statement issued May 2. “As international churches with congregations in many nations, we can and will use our global networks to promote a political framework to limit climate change, while in a unified voice we speak to the world about the urgency of committed climate work.”They addressed their statement to “our churches and to people of faith around the world.”The complete statement is here.The statement was announced the evening of May 1 during the opening session of a two-day gathering was sponsored by the Episcopal Church and the Church of Sweden. It included two public sessions at St John’s Lafayette Square, as well as visits to Capital Hill by the official participants to advocate for climate-change action. The theme of the conference was “sustaining hope in the face of climate change.”The genesis for the gathering, according to the Rev. Margaret R. Rose, the Episcopal Church’s deputy for ecumenical and interfaith collaboration, was a conversation between Jefferts Schori and Wejryd about the two churches’ ecumenical work and “our common passion about climate change.”Jefferts Schori acknowledged during her opening remarks to the gathering that “the idea of changing climate elicits grief in many people, as well it should.” She said that people express that grief in “many of the classic ways that we respond to all kinds of loss.”Some deny the facts, some look for others to blame and some get angry and flaunt their wastefulness or charge others with political manipulation of the media, she said.“And some get so depressed that they simply leave the conversation – ‘there’s nothing I can do, so why should I try?’ People of faith know another response, particularly in this Easter season.”That response, she said, begins with rejecting “the ancient demons of individualism, materialism and selfishness – what today we often call consumerism” because they all feed on a “self-focused fear of scarcity.” The drive to consume more and more “soon becomes time stolen from the possibility of healing, like the time that could be spent building deep and meaningful friendships with God and neighbor …  we are made whole in loving God and neighbor and not ourselves alone.”Cassandra Carmichael, director of the National Council of Churches Washington office, (left) and the Rev. Margaret Bullitt-Jonas, priest associate of Grace Church, Amherst, Massachusetts and co-chair of Religious Witness for the Earth join in singing “This Little Light of Mine” led by the Rev. Henrik Grape, coordinator of the Church of Sweden’s environmental network and a member of the climate group of Christian Council of Sweden. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe presiding bishop invoked the Easter season to say that, along with the risen Christ, there is “abundant hope that the body of God’s creation might also rise – renewed, redeemed, and made whole.”“May we be made Christ’s passion, God’s hands, and Spirit’s breath to make it so,” Jefferts Schori said.Swedish Archbishop Wejryd told the gathering on May 1 that the churches must “regain the notion of life as a gift … it’s given to us continuously.” With that recollection of the gift of life, “we might be able to move the focus from ourselves to the giver and the wishes, the ideals of the giver, and to the other people and to the rest of creation that are also gifts from that giver.”Science can help people focus on the gift of life by showing “how complicated, how diverse, how balanced, how interdependent” the world is, Wejryd said.Wejryd said he finds hope for the future and the role of the churches in that future in the knowledge that people of faith are “stewards of stories that tell us that things can change and they can change for the better.”Mary Evelyn Tucker, a senior lecturer and senior research scholar at Yale University and a co-founder and co-director of its Forum on Religion and Ecology gave the keynote address on May 1. She continued the conference’s theme of hope by suggesting that the academy (and scientists in particular) and the church must both change their stances in the face of overwhelming evidence of climate change.Tucker said “moral wakening is critical,” but, she asked, “will moral rebuke be sufficient or is evoking compassion for the earth community – both people and planet – what is also needed?”Guilt can be a motivator for change but, Tucker said, “if we are just inducing guilt into the people we won’t have the transformation of action and long-term change.”Tucker asked “how can we break through scientific complexity to moral clarity that gives rise to social, political and religious change?”“Scientific facts and graphs have not changed behavior,” she noted.And, scientists are not inclined to make the leap from describing problems to advocating prescriptions for change, according to both Tucker and another speaker at the opening session, Kevin Noone, the Swedish Secretariat for Environmental Earth System Sciences at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and a research scientist in atmospheric chemistry and physics at the Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University.Tucker also noted that “divinity schools have not made the climate central to their cause” and thus have lost the chance to train new generations of clergy and lay people.She also suggested that religious communities are filled with dichotomies that offer both barriers to working for climate change and foundations upon which to base such work. For instance, many denominations are hierarchical in their structure and make exclusive claims on truth but they also advocate fairness and equality, and are inclined toward “broad moral outreach.”Most important, Tucker said, is Christianity’s “incarnational sensibility.”“Incarnation alone would say ‘what a sacrilege that we are doing.’ This whole world is infused with the logos from the very beginning, as John’s gospel says,” she said.Tucker acknowledged that many denominations are worried about declining participation, but suggested they are focused in the wrong place.“Maybe the dying away of the churches is for a new birthing — a new Easter moment – that we will not be obsessed by our sectarian concerns but, we will be truly obsessed about the life of the planet that is disappearing before our eyes,” she said.People are in despair about the environmental future and in their existential concern lies “the call of the churches,” she added.The call cannot be answered just with “guilt inducing” or developing an ethic that provides answers, she said, and it is about more than taking leadership on practical issues such as changing to energy-efficient light bulbs or reducing carbon footprints.“If we do not provide the wellsprings of hope for who we are as humans in relation to a magnificent, diverse, alive, living universe, we will have failed in our task,” she said. “But as we let go of some of our concerns about whether we will live or die as institutions and when we put in front of us [the question of] will the earth live or die, we will find not only the hope but the power, the energy and the vision to go forward.”In his remarks, Noone continued the theme of community as a way to address climate change and agreed that scientists and theologians must be part of that community. “We have to be singing in a choir … not just one single voice.”And, he said, humans must not only repair their relations with each other but also with the created world. “It’s not ‘us and nature;’ it’s ‘us.’”Science is showing that this activity is not just changing how the planet looks, it is changing how the planet works, according to Noone. Still, there is hope in the fact that humans have drastically changed energy, transportation and agriculture in just the past two generations, Noone said. He argued that those changes show society can transform drastically and relatively swiftly.The challenge now is what sort of changes will be made, he said, and people have to decide, “how comfortable or dis-comfortable we want transitions into the future to be.”From left, Kevin Noone, Swedish Secretariat for Environmental Earth System Sciences at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and a research scientist in atmospheric chemistry and physics at the Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University; Mary Minnete, ELCA director of environmental education and advocacy, the North American representative to the ACT Alliance Climate Change Advisory Group and the current chair of the National Council of Churches’ Eco-Justice Working Group; Diocese of Panama Bishop Julio Murray and Willis Jenkins, the Margaret Farley Associate Professor of Social Ethics at Yale Divinity School discuss how to envision hope in the midst of climate change. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe conference’s May 2 public session featured two roundtable discussions, both facilitated by the Rev. David Crabtree, anchorman at WRAL-TV, North Carolina, and also an Episcopal Church deacon.“Envisioning hope: a faith-based, international response to climate change” participants included Diocese of Panama Bishop Julio Murray; Willis Jenkins, the Margaret Farley Associate Professor of Social Ethics at Yale Divinity School and author Ecologies of Grace: Environmental Ethics and Christian Theology; and Mary Minnete, ELCA director of environmental education and advocacy, the North American representative to the ACT Alliance Climate Change Advisory Group and the current chair of the National Council of Churches’ Eco-Justice Working Group.“Responding in Hope: the local church’s response to climate change” included the Rev. Margaret Bullitt-Jonas, priest associate of Grace Church, Amherst, Massachusetts and co-chair of Religious Witness for the Earth; the Rev. Henrik Grape, coordinator of the Church of Sweden’s environmental network and a member of the Climate group of the Christian Council of Sweden; and Cassandra Carmichael, director of the National Council of Churches Washington office and the NCC’s eco-justice program director.Minnete told the gathering that people of faith can tell politicians and policy makers stories they would otherwise not hear.“We can say to them ‘we’ve been to Africa and this is what we’ve seen’ or ‘we live in the Arctic and this is what we know’,” she said. “Those stories are very powerful because they come out of not our own interest but, our interest in our neighbors and in God’s creation. That’s something you don’t hear a lot in Washington and internationally in the climate change discussions.”Murray agreed and added that churches must stop thinking only about how they can speak for those whom they think of as voiceless and instead “articulate the space” where people who previously have not been heard can tell their stories.Speaking of neighbors, Jenkins answered a question about how churches can convince their members to truly love their neighbors in the midst of climate change discussions by saying the question people have to be willing to ask first is “are we willing to stop harming our neighbors.”“We let privilege cloud us from seeing what our obligations are,” he said. “I wouldn’t want to flatter us by saying we’re trying to figure out how to love our neighbors.”Faith communities must ignore political boundaries, he said, and come together to invent ways to stop harming each other “and, maybe …one day, learn how to love.”Bullitt-Jonas said “I’m putting the results in the hand of God. I do not know how this is going to end. If everyone chooses not to do anything, we can assume the end is not going to be so good.”“But if, one by one, more and more of us say ‘I’m going to live in the power of the risen Christ. I’m going to cast my lot with hope. I’m going to be on the winning team,’ who knows what God can do with that,” she said. “Then the future is open-ended and we get to create it.”On-demand video recordings of most of the May 2 sessions are here.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Jeffrey Parker says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET May 15, 2013 at 9:22 am Let’s see. Where to start a response to the above comment…When have the voices of the progressive church had an influence? I’d suggest three times at least: the Civil Rights movement, prior to that, the Abolition movement, the Anti-war Movement.Rather than promoting guilt, Tucker specifically argued that guilt will *not* produce the transformational, long- term change needed. Rather, she recommended compassion for both people and planet. Stephen, for a long while we were not aware of the connection between the energy, transportation and food systems that evolved bit by bit and their impact on the natural systems on which we all depend. Humankind did not deliberately set out to destroy nature. As we become more aware, however, it becomes our responsibility to act to fundamentally change the human-made systems that undermine our survival and that of our neighbor, even if it means altering our current lifestyle. And sometimes guilt is appropriate, as it will be if, knowing the impacts our choices have, we put our heads in the sand and fail to make the changes required for ours and our neighbor’s survival.I see the speakers as calling us to wake up, look at the big picture beyond our day to day lives, consider the impacts of our choices on nature, including ourselves, and unite in effective action. I do not see a focus on guilt.Thank you to these leaders for convening this meeting to address humanity’s fundamental challenge. The engagement of the faith community is essential if we are to meet it. Ecumenical & Interreligious, Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Environment & Climate Change Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL May 3, 2013 at 11:17 am Where does this come from? “rejecting “the ancient demons of individualism…” Individualism is now wrong? And to be clear, it is not a synonym for selfishness. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 ClimateChangeDC, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more


first_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA By ENS staffPosted Nov 16, 2015 People This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID House of Bishops, November 17, 2015 at 7:32 pm Jean Shirey wrote “With respect” in comments and “reached the point” I wonder what “point” that is? The author of the posted article also wrote “17th woman to be elected a bishop . . .” Since Bishop Glasspool chose/chooses to identify herself by characteristics of woman, openly lesbian, then others can use those respectfully, which I think the writer of the article has done. Presiding Bishop Curry chooses to identify himself as black, and as the first Black Presiding Bishop. If I choose to identify myself as Hispanic, Latina and someone acknowledges that, I am proud and honored and feel respected that a person has used those characteristics. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ November 16, 2015 at 7:32 pm With respect, have we not reached the point when posts no longer need to say, “…openly gay” or “…openly lesbian”? Selena Smith says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Doug Desper says: November 20, 2015 at 9:31 am ‘Point’ well taken and well stated. I agree with you. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska November 21, 2015 at 2:54 pm One wonders why race or gender or sexual identity are often named (sometimes exploited) as accomplishments. If we look back on Dr. King’s view of such things we should never hear that someone is anything except what they say and what they actually accomplish. Anything less than a record of accomplishment serve no purpose except to check off diversity markers. Haven’t we gotten into enough recent anguish settling for mere symbolism over substance? November 17, 2015 at 7:31 pm Jean Shirey wrote “With respect” in comments and “reached the point” I wonder what “point” that is? The author of the posted article also wrote “17th woman to be elected a bishop . . .” Since Bishop Glasspool chose/chooses to identify herself by characteristics of woman, openly lesbian, then others can use those respectfully, which I think the writer of the article has done. Presiding Bishop Curry chooses to identify himself as black, and as the first Black Presiding Bishop. If I choose to identify myself as Hispanic, Latina and someone acknowledges that, I am proud and honored and feel respected that a person has used those characteristics. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Selena Smith says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ May 4, 2016 at 9:46 am However anyone wishes to identify themselves should be the norm, should be ok, should be accepted by the rest of us.If a person’s life experience tells them they need to identify themselves on a more “detailed” level, in order to be understood, or better yet, to help the next person with a common feature who cannot create identification with their world, then who is to say which is the right or wrong way? Whether the Bishop chooses to put her identity out there or others repeat it in articles about her, its who she is.We should allow each other to represent ourselves the way we feel best, and if its ok with the individual, not be concerned with that reiteration in press, common parlance or characterizations. in searching for an email address to thank Bishop Glasspool for confirming my son this past Sunday, I stumbled on this press release. I didn’t know she was lesbian, or out, de facto. I was happy to have a woman at the altar – Her power at the pulpit and her evident love for the kids and her calling was what I identified with as a woman, a family member of a confirmand and an episcopalian fellow. As well, I love thsat our faith accepts into the priesthood women and LGBT people!It’s all down to identification. If I were lesbian and having my child confirmed, I do think I may feel a deeper connection to the process if I knew the priest entrusted with my child’s faith and journey shared a similar experience. No matter what, she blew the socks off everyone in that church! She is amazing. Submit an Event Listing [Episcopal News Service] Diocese of Los Angeles Bishop Suffragan Mary Glasspool will become an assistant bishop in the Diocese of New York next April.The two dioceses announced the change Nov. 14.Glasspool, 61, was elected bishop suffagran of Los Angeles on Dec. 4, 2009, and was consecrated on May 15, 2010, along with Bishop Suffragan Diane Jardine Bruce who was elected by the same convention that elected Glasspool.Glasspool was at the time the 17th woman to be elected a bishop in The Episcopal Church, and the first openly lesbian woman to become a bishop in the Anglican Communion.She was born on Staten Island when her father was the rector jointly of All Saints Church and St. Simon’s Church. She grew up in Goshen, New York, after her father became the rector of St. James Church.“Mary is a person of extraordinary ability and deep faith, a true friend, and a seasoned bishop,” New York Bishop Andrew Dietsche told delegates at the diocese’s annual convention. “She will bless us in myriad ways, and it is such a personal joy to make this announcement!”Glasspool wrote to the Diocese of Los Angeles about the announcement, saying in part that “to write that I am deeply grateful for this time of service in the Diocese of Los Angeles is an understatement.”Diocesan Bishop Jon Bruno told the diocese that “although we together feel a sense of loss and sadness at Bishop Glasspool’s departure, we can also share with her our ongoing support and appreciation for her many gifts and skills that she has shared with us so generously.” Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Joanna Griner Cawley says: Rector Bath, NC Diocese of Los Angeles Bishop Mary Glasspool moving to New York Miguel Rosada says: center_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA December 7, 2015 at 1:24 pm Is it then going to be okay if someone chooses to respectfully identify themselves as a white , heterosexual, male? I think beginning to move beyond labels would be helpful.Blessings Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments (7) Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Jean Shirey says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rick Spring says: Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Tagslast_img read more