Category Archives: vtuctqxvrymq

Ban voices serious concern over stalemate in recovering missing Kuwaitis from Iraq

“I am also concerned at the absence of progress with regard to finding the Kuwaiti archives,” Mr. Ban wrote in his report to the Security Council.Mr. Ban noted that Gennady Tarasov, the High-level Coordinator for the issue, reported that security conditions in Iraq had improved enough to allow exhumation work to resume at sites known to contain Kuwaiti prisoners of war and to permit the assessment of new mass graves.The Iraqi Minister for Human Rights, who heads the only body authorized to exhume graves in the country, explained that it only had one team of 12 individuals able to perform the task and that they were currently occupied with the exhumation and identification of victims of the previous regime as well as casualties of the Iran-Iraq war.In his report, the Secretary-General extended his “heartfelt condolences” to the families of the 236 Kuwaiti and third-country nationals whose remains have been identified to date – one more since his previous report in June – adding that no new information had been received on the fate of the missing American Serviceman, Captain Michael Scott Speicher.Mr. Ban also stressed that despite constant encouragement by his Coordinator and himself, no information had emerged pointing to the whereabouts of Kuwaiti State and historical documents, nor had anyone confirmed that the archives had been destroyed.“No credible facts or possible leads have emerged since my last report regarding missing Kuwaiti national archives,” said Mr. Ban. While noting Iraq’s positive stance over the humanitarian process of identifying and repatriating missing Kuwaitis as well as finding the documents, he stressed that statements of goodwill need to be translated into concrete action.“My appeal is directed to Iraq, as the side responsible for returning the Kuwaiti prisoners of war and archives, as well as to other parties concerned.” 9 December 2008Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon expressed his “serious concern” today at the inactivity on recovering the remains of Kuwaiti and other nationals missing since the 1990 Gulf war, in a report made public today. read more

More than 18 million people in West and Central Africa affected by

Elisabeth Byrs, a spokesperson for the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), told reporters in Geneva that greater financial resources are needed to respond to the situation in West Africa, where over 1.6 million people have been affected and 307 have lost their lives. Benin remained the country hardest hit by the floods, with over 700,000 persons affected, she noted, adding that OCHA will probably launch an appeal for the country at the end of this week.The World Food Programme (WFP) is preparing to reach 385,000 people and 13,000 host families with food aid over a two- month period. Distributions have started in some areas, with 200,000 people, including 27,000 children, receiving food baskets consisting of corn, oil, salt, and beans. Children are also receiving a supplementary ration of milk and therapeutic Plumpy’nut, a ready-to-eat peanut paste that is rich in protein. The Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF), which provides resources rapidly to assist people affected by natural disasters and conflicts, will also contribute $4 million to assist flood victims, Ms. Byrs said.Meanwhile, nearly 230,000 have been affected in Central Africa, where 90 people have lost their lives.In addition to the floods, over 52,000 cases of cholera have been reported in Central and West Africa since June, according to figures from the World Health Organization (WHO). The CERF has allotted over $650,000 to Cameroon in order to help the country fight cholera, an acute intestinal infection caused by eating food or drinking water that is contaminated. 26 October 2010Over 1.8 million people have been affected by floods in Central and West Africa, which have also killed nearly 400 people, the United Nations humanitarian arm reported today, adding that Benin remains the country hardest hit by the disaster. read more

Visitation this weekend for popular Badgers hockey player

The Brock community is mourning a popular hockey player who died suddenly two days ago.Vince Scott, 23, of Mississauga was killed in a car crash in Thorold on April 28. Scott was an honour student and the leading scorer of the Brock Badgers hockey team this season.Scott was a second-year Business Administration student who transferred to Brock from the University of Prince Edward Island. He was selected Most Valuable Player by his team in 2009/10, and participated in community initiatives like Brock’s “Little Badgers on Blades” hockey school.“Vinny had an engaging personality. Our conversations would start with hockey but seemed to evolve into a discussion of our families,” Brock coach Murray Nystrom told gobadgers.ca. “I will always remember his wit and welcoming smile.”Scott is survived by his parents, Bob and Sue Scott of Mississauga, and was a brother to Jenn, Tina and Paul. Memorial donations are being given to the Children’s Wish Foundation and Right to Play.Arrangements are as follows:Visitation:Turner and Porter Funeral Home1981 Dundas Street WestMississaugaSaturday evening: 5 to 9 p.m.Sunday afternoon: 2 to 4 p.m.Sunday evening: 6 to 9 p.m.Funeral:Monday, May 3, 10 a.m.Merciful Redeemer Church (905-812-0030)2775 Erin Centre BoulevardMississaugaInterment will be at Glen Oaks Memorial Gardens, Oakville.Links:• Obituary — Vincent Ronald Scott — Turner and Porter Funeral Home• Death pulls Brock hockey players together — St. Catharines Standard• Brock University Badgers: Vince Scott• Vincent Ronald Scott Obituary — The Toronto Star• Otters mourn loss of former player Vince Scott — OurSports CentralGet The Brock News delivered to your email read more

Monkey dust warning as police say increasingly popular drug is leading to

Monkey Dust user is restrained by police “By starting this very public conversation we hope to work with partners to create a joined-up approach that will hopefully lower the number of people using the drug and tackle the production and supply of the drug.”Users of the drug have been seen risking their lives and lashing out in drug-induced violent outbursts. They warned that some users have died while under the influence of the drug.“People who take these substances have absolutely no way of knowing what is contained within them as the chemicals are untested and unregulated,” said a West Midlands Ambulance Service spokesman.“The effect on the patient can vary considerably; our staff often treat legal high users who have suffered seizures, heart attacks and strokes. Some patients are left with long term illnesses whilst others never wake up.   “Working with our partners we must improve education and prevention efforts to stop people taking the drug in the first place, but we also need to identify more effective ways to treat those already under the influence. Chief Superintendent Jeff Moore said: “The drug is highly addictive and highly unpredictable, meaning emergency services can often struggle to provide the appropriate treatment to those under the influence. “Every user acts differently, displaying behaviour that is volatile and dangerous to both the user and emergency services personnel responding. The level of resource required is often far greater than we have experienced before with some suffering the effects of use for several days. A man high on 'Monkey Dust' prepares to jump off a house and onto a car bonnet below “It is not uncommon for users to mix these substances with alcohol which can lead to an even more severe adverse reaction.“Because it is impossible to tell what substances are used within the drugs, it can make it extremely difficult for our staff to provide treatment.  In short, users are putting their lives at risk every time they take them.” One man, pictured in the centre, had to be restrained by police officers so paramedics could treat his injuriesCredit:Staffordshire Police Police have warned of a potential public health crisis if the deadly drug known as ‘Monkey Dust’ is not dealt with immediately.The psychotic substance, which can cost as little as £2 for a small bag is a Class B drug and its effects have led people to jump off the roofs of houses and run into busy traffic.The drug, also known as MDPV, is synthetic and comes in powder form. It can be snorted, injected or smoked and its side effects can include paranoia and hallucinations. Another effect of monkey dust is that it can make users feel incredibly strong and lowers their pain perception. One ambulance worker in Staffordshire, where the problem is most acute, said that trying to restrain users can be like trying to restrain the Incredible Hulk.Staffordshire Police say that they are receiving an average of 10 or more calls a day related to monkey dust, with 950 incidents responded to in the last three months alone. The man who jumped from the roof had to be restrained by officers after he got up and started lashing out at policeCredit:Staffordshire Police “The effects can lead to the patient suffering extreme highs and lows which sometimes results in patients appearing to be suffering mental health issues at one end of the scale to extreme violence at the other. One man, pictured in the centre, had to be restrained by police officers so paramedics could treat his injuries A man high on ‘Monkey Dust’ prepares to jump off a house and onto a car bonnet belowCredit:Staffordshire Police Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

Parking meters contract can only be terminated through arbitration

The highly controversial contract between the Georgetown Mayor and City Council (M&CC) and the parking meter company, Smart City Solutions (SCS), can only be terminated through arbitration.According to the contract, if in any event a dispute arises over the terms of the agreement and there is need for it to be terminated, it must be done through arbitration by the International Centre for Dispute Resolution (ICDR) in Miami, Florida.The contract states under the “Dispute Resolution” clause that “the Parties expressly declare that any disputes arising in connection with the interpretation, performance, breach and termination of this Agreement shall be settled through arbitration.”It specified that the arbitration must be administered through the ICDR in accordance with the applicable rules of the Arbitration Committee of the International Business Council.There has been much resistance against the Parking Meter Project since the idea was flouted by the City Council.Since its implementation, that resistance has grown into a mass movement calling for the initiative to be shelved and the contract which was signed in total secrecy to be scrapped.But it appears that the parking meter company has taken all precautionary steps to ensure it is protected in any turn of events regarding the initiative.The contract stipulates that City Hall must be liable for any expenses incurred by the company as a result of a third party action.Among the shocking clauses in the contract are: the fact that the company can extend the duration of the 49-year agreement for an additional 49 years under the same terms of the current agreement, subject to the approval of City Hall; the company was given the option to operate in Guyana for almost one century; the contract’s ‘terror clause’ protects Smart City Solutions, as it includes a clause intended to scare the Mayor and City Council over the prospect of terminating the agreement.Hundreds continue to protest against the controversial parking metersShould the company be ordered by any court to take any form of action, which will incur expenses, then these will become the burden on the City Council.The reimbursement for any loss suffered as a result of third party action is titled “Indemnification.”The section reads, “The city shall indemnify the Concessionaire against all liabilities, costs, expenses, damages and losses including, but not limited to any direct, indirect or consequential losses, loss of profit, loss of reputation and all interest, penalties and legal costs and all other professional costs and expenses suffered or incurred by the Concessionaire.”The contract also provides for the Company to be reimbursed if any claim, action, motion, petition, summons, writ or other proceeding whatsoever made against the Town Clerk, the Mayor and Councillors of the City of Georgetown which results in the delay in the performance or frustration of this agreement.Additionally, if such payment due from the City is subject to tax (whether by way of direct assessment or withholding at its source), the company shall be entitled to receive from the city such amounts to ensure that the net amount received, after tax, is the same as it would have been were the payment not subject to tax.There has been widespread public outcry against the Parking Meter Project over the past months with a movement staging protest action against the “draconian” costs and penalties of the project.Already, the New Building Society (NBS) is challenging the legality of the parking meter By-laws in the courts.The case comes up before Justice Brassington Reynolds on February 20. (Guyana Times) Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedParking meters: Option to cancel contract included in Committee’s final report- FerreiraAugust 17, 2017In “Business”Letter: Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration: Principles and PracticeSeptember 8, 2018In “Letters”Parking Meter contract ‘one of the most corrupt deals’ in Guyana’s history – RamsammyFebruary 14, 2017In “Opinion”,The highly controversial contract between the Georgetown Mayor and City Council (M&CC) and the parking meter company, Smart City Solutions (SCS), can only be terminated through arbitration.According to the contract, if in any event a dispute arises over the terms of the agreement and there is need for it to be terminated, it must be done through arbitration by the International Centre for Dispute Resolution (ICDR) in Miami, Florida.The contract states under the “Dispute Resolution” clause that “the Parties expressly declare that any disputes arising in connection with the interpretation, performance, breach and termination of this Agreement shall be settled through arbitration.”It specified that the arbitration must be administered through the ICDR in accordance with the applicable rules of the Arbitration Committee of the International Business Council.There has been much resistance against the Parking Meter Project since the idea was flouted by the City Council.Since its implementation, that resistance has grown into a mass movement calling for the initiative to be shelved and the contract which was signed in total secrecy to be scrapped.But it appears that the parking meter company has taken all precautionary steps to ensure it is protected in any turn of events regarding the initiative.The contract stipulates that City Hall must be liable for any expenses incurred by the company as a result of a third party action.Among the shocking clauses in the contract are: the fact that the company can extend the duration of the 49-year agreement for an additional 49 years under the same terms of the current agreement, subject to the approval of City Hall; the company was given the option to operate in Guyana for almost one century; the contract’s ‘terror clause’ protects Smart City Solutions, as it includes a clause intended to scare the Mayor and City Council over the prospect of terminating the agreement.Hundreds continue to protest against the controversial parking metersShould the company be ordered by any court to take any form of action, which will incur expenses, then these will become the burden on the City Council.The reimbursement for any loss suffered as a result of third party action is titled “Indemnification.”The section reads, “The city shall indemnify the Concessionaire against all liabilities, costs, expenses, damages and losses including, but not limited to any direct, indirect or consequential losses, loss of profit, loss of reputation and all interest, penalties and legal costs and all other professional costs and expenses suffered or incurred by the Concessionaire.”The contract also provides for the Company to be reimbursed if any claim, action, motion, petition, summons, writ or other proceeding whatsoever made against the Town Clerk, the Mayor and Councillors of the City of Georgetown which results in the delay in the performance or frustration of this agreement.Additionally, if such payment due from the City is subject to tax (whether by way of direct assessment or withholding at its source), the company shall be entitled to receive from the city such amounts to ensure that the net amount received, after tax, is the same as it would have been were the payment not subject to tax.There has been widespread public outcry against the Parking Meter Project over the past months with a movement staging protest action against the “draconian” costs and penalties of the project.Already, the New Building Society (NBS) is challenging the legality of the parking meter By-laws in the courts.The case comes up before Justice Brassington Reynolds on February 20. (Guyana Times) read more

Pressure rises on Trump as probes intensify Republicans fret

By Ayesha Rascoe and Amanda Becker | WASHINGTONU.S. President Donald Trump speaks during the United States Coast Guard Academy Commencement Ceremony in New London, Connecticut U.S., May 17 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque(Reuters) Pressure built on U.S. President Donald Trump on Wednesday as lawmakers intensified probes into his ouster of the FBI chief and possible collusion between his 2016 campaign and Russia, more fellow Republicans called for an independent investigation and one even mentioned impeachment.The controversy spooked investors, but Trump delivered a defiant message, complaining during a speech that he was being treated more unfairly than any other politician ever.U.S. stocks and the dollar sold off and bond prices rallied as investors fled risky assets amid uncertainty about Trump’s ability to deliver on his policy agenda, such as tax and regulatory changes. The S&P 500 was on track for its worst day since September.The tumult in Washington deepened over allegations Trump had sought to end the FBI’s investigation into ties between Trump’s first national security adviser, Michael Flynn, and Russia. This raised questions about whether the president improperly attempted to interfere with a federal investigation.House of Representatives Speaker Paul Ryan insisted that Republicans, who control both chambers of Congress, were not seeing their legislative agenda mired, but the controversy enveloped Washington.James Comey, whose firing as FBI director last week triggered a political firestorm, wrote a memo detailing how Trump commented to him in February “I hope you can let this go,” referring to the Flynn probe, a source who has seen a memo written by Comey said on Tuesday.The White House on Tuesday said the report was “not a truthful or accurate portrayal of the conversation between the president and Mr. Comey.”The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee invited Comey to testify next Wednesday. Republican Senator Lindsey Graham, a senior member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, said panel members were also inviting Comey to testify at an undetermined date.Trump removed Comey in the middle of a Federal Bureau of Investigation probe into alleged Russian interference in the the 2016 U.S. presidential election, and possible ties between Trump’s campaign and Russia. In a separate but related probe, the FBI is looking into Flynn’s ties with Russia.As the controversy swirled, Trump said in a speech to U.S. Coast Guard Academy graduates in Connecticut he did not get elected “to serve the Washington media or special interests.”“Look at the way I have been treated lately, especially by the media. No politician in history, and I say this with great surety, has been treated worse or more unfairly,” Trump said.In the face of unfairness, “you have to put your head down and fight, fight, fight. Never ever, ever give up. Things will work out just fine,” he said.The president has long bristled at the notion that Russia played any role in his November upset win but the Russia issue has clouded his early months in office. Moscow has denied U.S. intelligence agencies’ conclusion it meddled in the campaign to try to tilt the election in Trump’s favor.REQUESTS FOR DOCUMENTSThe Senate Judiciary Committee asked the FBI to provide memos related to Comey’s dealings with his superiors in the Trump and Obama administrations.It also asked the White House to provide records of interactions with Comey, including those “relating to the FBI’s investigation of alleged ties between President Trump’s associates and Russia, or the Clinton email investigation, including all audio recordings, transcripts, notes, summaries, or memoranda,” according to a statement.On Tuesday, the Republican chairman of a House oversight committee, Jason Chaffetz, set a May 24 deadline for the FBI to produce all relevant material relating to any communications between Comey and Trump. Ryan backed Chaffetz’s request.Democratic lawmakers have demanded that the Justice Department name a special prosecutor to investigate the Russia matter. About 10 House Republicans and four Senate Republicans have called for some sort of independent investigation.Interfering with a federal investigation might constitute obstruction of justice and could potentially be invoked in any attempt to impeach Trump.Asked by reporters whether he thought the allegations against Trump were grounds for impeachment, Republican Representative Justin Amash said, “If the allegations are true, yes. But everybody in this country gets a fair trial, including the president or anyone else.”Amash is a member of the hard-line House Freedom Caucus who has already has called for an independent commission to investigate. Asked if he trusted Comey or Trump, Amash replied: “I think it’s pretty clear I have confidence in Director Comey.”It would be significant if more Republicans began to talk about impeaching the president, as the party holds a majority in both chambers of Congress. A simple majority is required in the House to impeach a president, which would lead to a trial by the Senate and possible removal from office. A small number of Democrats also have mentioned impeachment.Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski said on Wednesday it may be time for an independent commission or special prosecutor, expressing concern about “the continuous and often conflicting reports about President Trump, the FBI and Russia.”“The American people deserve to know the truth,” she said.Republican Adam Kinzinger, a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, told CNN on Wednesday “it’s time for an independent commission or a special prosecutor or whatever.”PUTIN VIEW OF LAVROV TALKSWord of the Comey memo followed a week of chaos at the White House after Trump fired the FBI director on May 9. Criticism of the president intensified after it emerged on Monday that he discussed sensitive national security information about Islamic State with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and Russia’s ambassador in Washington at a White House meeting last week.Russian President Vladimir Putin said on Wednesday that Trump had not passed on any secrets to Lavrov. Putin made light of the matter at a news conference in Russia, saying Moscow was ready to hand a transcript of the meeting to U.S. lawmakers if that would help reassure them.Most Republicans have said the current FBI probe and investigations in Congress into the Russia matter are sufficient. Ryan stuck to that line and told reporters on Wednesday he still has confidence in Trump.“We need the facts,” Ryan said. “It is obvious there are some people out there who want to harm the president. But we have an obligation to carry out our oversight regardless of which party is in the White House.“I’m sure we’re going to go on to hear from Mr. Comey about why, if this happened as he allegedly describes, why didn’t he take action at the time? So there are a lot of unanswered questions.”However, several Republicans conveyed a sense of an administration in turmoil.“Controversy after controversy or cut after cut is not good for any administration,” Senator Richard Shelby told reporters.(Additional reporting by David Alexander, Doina Chiacu, Patricia Zengerle, Richard Cowan and Tim Ahmann in Washington, and Caroline Valetkevitch in New York; Writing by Will Dunham; Editing by Jonathan Oatis and Frances Kerry) Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedU.S. lawmakers push for answers on Trump team’s Russia tiesFebruary 16, 2017In “World”Trump goes on offensive against ex-FBI chief, calling him a ‘leaker’June 9, 2017In “World”Trump, sworn in as U.S. president, promises to put ‘America First’January 20, 2017In “World” read more

Space Shuttle The Complete Missions video takes us through 30 years of

first_imgThe bittersweet ending of the US Space Shuttle program is still fresh in the minds of a lot of people, and this 8-minute tribute to the program, complete with scenes from every shuttle mission launched, in space, and landing prove the point.Starting with the first shuttle launch and ending with STS-135, Atlantis‘ landing just last week, the video walks us through the triumphs and tragedies of America’s Space Shuttle program, including the first spacewalks, the Hubble repair mission, docking with MIR, the Challenger disaster, the Columbia disaster, building the International Space Station, and everything NASA has accomplished in between.The entire video is full of beautiful footage from shuttle launches, landings, and missions in-orbit, sliced up with often funny slice-of-life moments of life in freefall aboard a shuttle in orbit. We see the first launch of shuttle Endeavour, and a number of other historic moments from the program. Even though the video is littered with historic and inspiring moments, it’s probably some of the shots of the Space Shuttle rocketing into orbit and floating above the Earth that are the most impressive.The video closes out with a sequence of landings from some of the most recent shuttle missions, including the landing of STS-1325, the last shuttle mission ever. The whole thing is a fitting and emotional tribute to an inspirational program.The video production arm of the journal Nature produced the video, and it’s part of the journal’s celebration of the Space Shuttle program as it comes to an end and we look forward to the future of manned spaceflight.via Naturelast_img read more

Kids Dig! Archaeology the question and the answer at fort

first_imgOn Saturday afternoon, Amy Clearman stood in front of about a dozen kids at Fort Vancouver and asked a simple question: “What is archaeology?”Speaking in soft voices, the kids, all between ages 8 and 12, took stabs at the question. Did it involve digging up bows and arrows? What about the bones of Woolly Mammoths eaten by early humans? None of them said anything about dinosaurs, which Clearman later said is a common guess. Their answers, she said, were close.“Archaeologists are kind of like detectives,” explained Clearman, a research assistant and graduate student at Portland State University.She said that archaeologists use clues and the scientific method to “tell a story of who was there.” She explained that the area the kids were sitting in had thousands of years of history and was once used by native people to cultivate Camas. They were about to get first-hand exposure to that history as part of Kids Dig!, a program where kids engage in a mock excavation digging up, screening and identifying real historical artifacts.She gave kids a rundown of the excavation: they’d be using trowels and other tools to dig in dirt pits for artifacts, using screens and brushes to dust them off. Finally, they would write down what they found. The kids grabbed work gloves from a bucket and got to work in groups at four different sites.Using trowels and dustpans, they shoveled dirt onto screens placed over buckets. They sifted dirt away to reveal more modern objects such as old tennis balls and mugs. As they continued digging, they found artifacts from older eras: shards of ceramic plates, smoking pipes, fur and obsidian used by indigenous people to make tools.last_img read more

Jorge Valdano Underestimating Santiago Solari is not wise

first_imgIn a column for El Pais, Argentine Jorge Valdano hailed his compatriot Santiago Solari’s football wisdom by reminding everybody of his roots.Even before the first ever match that Santiago Solari managed as the interim Real Madrid manager, it was evident that football scholars like Jorge Valdano would praise the man’s football wisdom.The whole manner in which the Argentine manager arrived in Real Madrid by taking Julen Lopetegui’s spot in the hot seat, didn’t go as probably many of the people who know Solari expected.One of the football legends who know Santiago and has watched him grow throughout his career is Jorge Valdano, another Argentine former player who has a bright past in Real Madrid and is one of football’s most respected voices.Him and Solari share a bond that is very unique, both of them have featured in the Spanish journal El Pais, where they have written countless opinion pieces about La Liga football and Jorge is currently writing every single week.This past week’s piece needed to talk about Santiago’s irruption in the club and how much it means for the man to take the seat in the club that became the bedrock of his whole career, but Valdano was very surprised by the first press conference that Solari ever gave to the press.”Conviene no subestimar a Solari, debajo de su impecable traje hay un balón lleno de barro”, escribe Jorge Valdano. En @elpais_deportes https://t.co/HgoqHc6gET— EL PAÍS (@el_pais) November 3, 2018As we may have discovered in the opinion pieces he has written in the past, Santiago Hernan Solari is a very educated man who has a rich knowledge of the Spanish language.During most of his first moments with the press ahead of Los Blancos’ Copa del Rey match against Melilla, Solari was himself and offered an eloquent set of responses that are in line with his personality.However, there was a minor moment that had a big impression with everybody who knows him after he said that the squad needed to play with “balls”.Using profanity has never really been a trade that Santiago entertains in the way he conducts himself, but he felt that it was needed at that moment for some reason.The reaction from the press was pretty quick, something that appeared to have angered Valdano because he felt the need to come out and defend his compatriot on his latest opinion piece for El Pais.In his words, we can tell that Jorge didn’t take the criticism against Solari very well because he believes the backlash came from a negative place and from people who usually come after Real Madrid for no reason.Valdano wanted to remind everyone, that Solari may have used slight profanity but his football knowledge remains intact.Fati and Suarez shine against Valencia at Camp Nou Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 15, 2019 With a mesmerizing first half from Ansu Fati and a brace from Luis Suarez in the second half, Barcelona demolished Valencia at Camp Nou.Valencia…¡Solari debuta como técnico del @realmadrid en el Bernabéu! 👌#RealMadridRealValladolid pic.twitter.com/xntbXNXXwj— LaLiga (@LaLiga) November 3, 2018“And along came Solari, ‘with two balls against Melilla’,” wrote Jorge Valdano for El Pais.“The statements that didn’t sit well in Real Madrid’s public farewell to Lopetegui, where the club bragged about their seven Ballon d’Or nominated players.”These types of unfortunate statements are the reason people dislike Real Madrid so much sometimes. On one side, they do have an incredible roster.”“But on the other side, there will always be that persistent claim of authority and superiority coming from Real Madrid. Just to sum this up, I guess that Santiago was referring to a set of Balls d’Or.”“Solari doesn’t have that particular dysfunction, he has a much more complex personality. Even though he may be capable to fully understand Nietzsche, he also comes from a family where everyone is a professional in football.”“When every single member of that family decided to hang up their boots, they made the decision to go back to the more amateur side of the game where uneven football pitches and old footballs were the norms.”“All of them wanted to keep teaching football from a place of wisdom, astuteness, and sacrifice. Santiago has absorbed all of that since he was a kid, which is why underestimating him is not wise.”“Because under that elegant suit, there is also a ball covered in mud,” he wrote.Vinicius abrazando a Solari😍😍😍😍 pic.twitter.com/Nk7SZ7PBfF— Real Madrid™ (@RMadridSoccer) November 3, 2018What do you think about Santiago Solari’s first two matches as the Real Madrid manager? Please share your opinion in the comment section down below.last_img read more

People still love distracted driving new IIHS study finds

first_img Tags More than 800 deaths from automobile crashes in 2017 could be attributed to phone-based distracted driving, according to extrapolated data from a new Insurance Institute for Highway Safety study.The IIHS study compares distracted driving in Northern Virginia between 2014 and 2017, the latest full year for which crash data was available. According to its 2018 roadside survey, drivers in that area were 57 percent more likely to be fiddling with a device behind the wheel than in 2014. Of all the drivers observed in the study, 3.4 percent were manipulating a phone behind the wheel, up from 2.3 percent in 2014.Here’s how the IIHS ran its study. It placed researchers at 12 locations across Northern Virginia, including both intersections and straight roads. Approximately 12,000 drivers were observed over the course of the study. It then used that data to create a nationwide model, including additional research that showed the risk of a fatal crash is 66 percent higher when phone manipulation is involved. Enlarge ImageAt the least, people are slowly figuring out that physically holding a phone and taking calls while driving is a bad idea. martin-dm/Getty Images Interestingly enough, drivers observed as part of the IIHS study were less likely to actually hold or talk on a phone. Fewer drivers were seen making hand-held calls and physically holding their phones, but a phone doesn’t have to be held to be distracting, and it appears that folks are just finding different ways to use their phones behind the wheel, contributing to an overall rise in distracted driving.”The latest data suggest that drivers are using their phones in riskier ways,” says David Kidd, a senior research scientist with the Highway Loss Data Institute. “The observed shift in phone use is concerning because studies consistently link manipulating a [phone] while driving to increased crash risk.”During its study, the IIHS found a full 23 percent of drivers were engaged in distracted driving, whether that meant using a phone, smoking, eating or grooming. In fact, the proportion of drivers using phones was actually lower than the proportion of drivers distracted by non-phone activities. Even though crash deaths involving distractions have been lowering, the IIHS notes that this data is tough to source, because it requires the people involved in the crash being truthful to the police about driving while distracted. More From Roadshow 1 Self-driving cars: Wait for these to arrive before you pull out the phone.Concept cars: See how automakers envision post-driving life.  2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Our favorite car tech and luxury features of 2018 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Share your voice 17 Photos Comment 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value Car Industrylast_img read more

Glowing orbs spotted hovering above Kansas authorities clueless as conspiracy theorists suspect

first_imgPixabayIn an interesting development, two glowing orbs were spotted in the skies of Kansas. The sighting soon went viral on online platforms, and even weather authorities are completely clueless about the bizarre sighting.The National Weather Service (NWS) wrote on Twitter that they literally have no explanation for the mysterious sighting. As NWS failed to give a proper explanation, several social media users started alleging that alien spaceships have reached the earth to monitor human activities. Some users even went a step ahead and assured that extraterrestrials are gearing up for an invasion.We honestly have no explanation for the floating objects over Kansas City.— NWS Kansas City (@NWSKansasCity) June 21, 2019Popular UFO researcher Scott C Waring also analyzed the clip, and he alleged that the government is trying to cover up realities of alien life.”Thousands of eyewitness in Kansas City saw huge UFO orbs in the sky over the city two days ago. Even the local news recorded a few and posted to Twitter what they had seen. This prompted DARPA to respond saying that they had released three lighter than air objects in the area. I believe since DARPA is a government agency that it is lying to the public and trying to cover up an actual UFO fleet over Kansas City. The US government will try anything and everything to cover up actual UFO sightings and here is 100% proof that they are doing it again here,” wrote Waring on his website ET Date Base.The new UFO sighting has been reported just a few days after United States president Donald Trump expressed his thoughts about extraterrestrial existence. While interacting with ABC, Trump revealed that he does not believe in aliens. It should be noted that Pentagon had earlier confirmed that they had carried out a secret investigative mission to unveil the secrets surrounding UFO sightings. Recently, several US Navy officials had also revealed that they saw flying objects speeding in hypersonic speed, and performing weird maneuvers on the skies.Even though several Navy officials suggested otherworldly possibilities, Leon Golub, a senior astrophysicist at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics claimed that extraterrestrial origin of these flying objects is very unlikely.  As per Golub, several factors that include atmospheric effects, and neurological overload from continuous flights could be the real cause of these sightings, especially among pilots.   In the meantime, a section of other conspiracy theorists had started arguing that these glowing orbs could be secret anti-gravity military vessels developed by superpowers like the United States, Russia or China. As per these conspiracy theorists, the flying orbs spotted in Kansas could be spying crafts sent by Russia or China to learn more about US geography and activities.last_img read more

Kader Siddiqui joins Oikya Front

first_imgKader Siddiqui. File photoKrishak Sramik Janata League (KSJL) of Kader Siddiqui on Monday formally joined Dr Kamal Hossain-led Jatiya Oikya Front, aiming to ensure a credible and acceptable national election in the country, reports UNB.KSJL president Kader Siddiqui came up with the announcement at a press conference at his party office in the capital’s Motijheel area.”We want a credible and acceptable [national] election where people will be able to cast their votes. So, I declare my party’s decision with pleasure that from now on we’re with Dr Kamal Hossain-led Jatiya Oikya front,” he said.Kader Siddiqui was supposed to come up with the announcement of joining the Oikya Front at a discussion at the Institution of Engineers, Bangladesh in presence of Dr Kamal Hossain on Saturday, but he took time to take the final decision in this regard.last_img read more

Mars Shows Us How Hard It Will Be to Go Where No

first_img National Geographic’s documentary/drama hybrid Mars premieres tomorrow night, and if the pilot episode is any indication, fans of hard sci-fi will find a lot to like about it. The show begins with the very optimistic premise that in 2033, all the worlds’ space agencies have joined together with private space exploration companies to create the International Mars Science Foundation. We meet the crew of Daedalus, the first spaceship to form a colony on Mars. The captain gives the rest of the crew one last chance to back out. When none of them do, the rocket launches.We cut back to 2016 for the documentary portion of the show. We hear from scientists why going to Mars is necessary for survival. If humans have two planets to live on, our chances of extinction are greatly reduced. We hear from SpaceX, whose stated goal, in addition to launching billion-dollar satellites for NASA, is to make humanity a multi-planet civilization.In 2036, we hear the pre-launch interviews with the crew, where they basically echo the sentiments expressed by the real-life 2016 scientists. We then skip the long, presumably uneventful journey to Mars and watch the crew try to land. The thrusters go offline, and the captain has to hot-swap a few circuits to get them to work. Before we find out if he succeeds or not, the show cuts back to real-life 2016 where we learn that landing is really the hardest part. We have the technology to land a one-ton rover on the planet, but nothing heavier than that.The Daedalus prepares to land on Mars. (Photo: Screenshot via National Geographic)This is the pattern the show follows for the rest of the episode. The crew runs into a problem, and we cut back to 2016 to learn why it’s such a big problem. Then we cut back to 2033 to see how we’ve solved that problem in the future. Current scientists talk about setting up a basecamp ahead of time with machines that pull water out of the atmosphere, shelters where people can live and produce food and most importantly, 3-D printers that would allow the settlers to build what they need. That gives us the context we need to realize that it’s a huge setback when the crew overshoots their landing by a significant distance.The mixing of documentary and sci-fi drama works very well and enhances both sections of the show. I get the feeling that neither section would hold up all that well on its own. The drama is a simple, standard space colonization story with very flat characters. What little we do learn about the crew of Daedalus is given to us in expository interviews. When faced with a crisis, they’re professional and competent and emotionless. They’re exactly who you would want to carry out a mission like this, but it doesn’t make for great drama.The documentary, on the other hand, is very interesting and comprehensive. It gets you thinking about what it would take to get to Mars and instills a feeling of excitement that the real-life Mars mission isn’t that far away. But there isn’t much there. It’s all about things that are happening right now, and I don’t know that there’s enough of a story to support a full series or movie on its own. Also at times, it feels less like a documentary and more like a PR video for SpaceX.SpaceX tests a reusable rocket in the documentary portion of Mars. (Photo: Screenshot via National Geographic)But that’s the beauty of having the show be a hybrid like this. Both sections complement each other to create a compelling hour of television. Each part makes the other work. The documentary helps you understand the problems the future crew faces. Even if you don’t care about the characters, you understand what’s at stake; you appreciate the immensity of the challenge, which makes the fictional part of the show so much more exciting. Likewise, the drama lets us see exactly what all these scientists are building towards in the documentary segments. We’re shown where everything is going and are more invested in the work it takes to get there.Mars combines a fascinating documentary with an exciting, if a little dry, sci-fi drama. It reminds me a little bit of Carl Sagan’s Contact, only focused on space colonization instead of aliens. It’s that kind of hard science fiction that you don’t see very often on TV or movies. I’d hope the characters get fleshed out a little more as the series goes on, but it almost doesn’t matter. The combination of modern science and a realistic picture of where it’s all headed is exciting enough that I’m on board for the next six weeks. Elon Musk’s Cheeky ‘Nuke Mars!’ Post Is Taking Over TwitterNASA Tests Mars 2020 Rover Prototype at Icelandic Lava Field Stay on targetlast_img read more

VIDEO The Future of Medical Physics in a Changing Healthcare World

first_img Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First #AAPM2018 Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Technology Reports View all 9 items Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Videos | AAPM | August 01, 2018 VIDEO: The Future of Medical Physics in a Changing Healthcare World Conference Coverage View all 396 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Find more SCCT news and videos FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Recent Videos View all 606 items Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  AAPM President Bruce Thomadsen Outlines Future of Medical PhysicsVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 6:00Loaded: 2.77%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -6:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) President Bruce Thomadsen, M.D., professor of medical physics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, discusses the future direction of medical physics in a changing healthcare environment at the 2018 AAPM meeting.Other coverage from the AAPM 2018 meeting. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology View all 220 items Women’s Health View all 62 items Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019.last_img read more

Tica champion Hanna Gabriels to defend WBO title against Kali Reis

first_imgRelated posts:Costa Rica’s world boxing champions win fights on the same night Boxing: Nicaragua’s ‘Chocolatito’ González, from garbage collector to flyweight champ Hanna Gabriels retains her world titles in vibrant fight TV exec made Mayweather-Pacquiao bout possible Tica boxerHanna Gabriels will defend her World Boxing Organization (WBO) Super Welterweight (154 lbs) title Saturday night in a 10-round fight against the U.S.’s Kali Reis at Edgardo Baltodano stadium in Liberia, Guanacaste.Reis, a Providence, Rhode Island native, is currently the International Boxing Association’s (IBA) Middleweight (160 lbs) World Champion and holds a record of 14-1-1 with 10 KOs. She arrived in Costa Rica on Monday and attended a promotional presentation of the fight Tuesday, including the official face off with Gabriels.Reis told reporters she is feeling well and that she’s used to fight outside the U.S. and with opponents from other categories as it can be difficult to find opponents of her weight. She has fought in Argentina, Bermuda and various European countries.Reis is the first Native American woman to become a professional boxer. She has Cherokee, Nipmuc and Seaconke Wampanoag ancestry. The fighter says it’s an honor to represent her culture and that it was natural for her to choose a boxing ring as a career since her people “have been fighting for centuries.”At Tuesday’s event she said she has watched videos of some of the Tica’s fights but “only to get a general idea of ​​her style, without getting into details.” She said that, just like herself, Gabriels is a very skilled fighter, has good strength, power and endurance and throws a lot of punches.Gabriels will defend her Super Welterweight title after defeating Mexican Paty Ramírez by TKO last Dec. 20 in Puerto Rico. Her professional record currently stands at 14-1-1 with 10 KOs.The Tica said she already made the required weight and that she has been training with great sparring partners, all men, who have pushed her to the top of her skills. Currently Gabriels is mostly focusing on physical work at the gym, and waiting for the fight.“I know Kali is very fast and strong. She administers her strength, moves very well in the ring and calculates every punch she throws,” she told The Tico Times.Gabriels’ coach Marco Delgado said Reis is possibly the best professional boxer to visit Costa Rica. “It will be a very tough fight, but I’m confident that Hanna has everything to successfully defend her title,” he said at the fight presentation Tuesday.Delgado noted that Reis is a very strong boxer with a powerful punch, however he believes she’s slower than the Tica. “Hanna has demonstrated a lot of discipline and her physical shape right now is very impressive,” he said.In addition to the world title fight, the event in Liberia will include nine preliminary fights with Tico fighters facing contenders from Panama and Nicaragua.Tickets range from ₡5,000 to ₡12,000 ($9 to $22) and are available at Liberia’s Sports Committee office inside the Edgardo Baltodano stadium.See Hanna Gabriels training Alberto Font contributed to this story. Facebook Commentslast_img read more

Orders for US durable goods jump 34 percent in June

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — Orders to U.S. factories for big-ticket manufactured goods posted a sizable gain in June, reflecting a surge in demand for commercial aircraft. Meanwhile, a key category that reflects business investment rebounded after two months of declines.Orders for durable goods jumped 3.4 percent in June from May, when orders had fallen 2.1 percent, the Commerce Department reported Monday. The gain was the best result since March. Ex-FBI agent details raid on Phoenix body donation facility Arizona families, Arizona farms: A legacy of tradition embracing animal care and comfort through modern technology 5 greatest Kentucky Derby finishes Top Stories A category viewed as a proxy for business investment plans increased 0.9 percent, then best showing since a 1.6 percent rise in March. This category had declined in April and May and had been weak for a number of months. Some economists are hopeful that manufacturing will show stronger gains in coming months as consumers boost spending.U.S. manufacturers have struggled this year from the effects of a strong dollar and a plunge in energy prices. The higher value of the dollar against foreign currencies makes U.S. goods more expensive and less competitive in major export markets. The big drop in oil prices has led energy companies to cut investment plans.The overall economy stalled in the January-March quarter, with the gross domestic product shrinking at an annual rate of 0.2 percent. Analysts blamed that weakness on a number of temporary factors including a harsh winter. They expect growth to rebound to around 2.5 percent in the April-June quarter. The government will release its first estimate of GDP growth in the spring on Thursday.For June, demand for aircraft shot up 66.1 percent, recovering from a 31.6 percent plunge in May. Orders for motor vehicles and parts posted a modest 0.2 percent increase. Overall demand for transportation goods increased 8.9 percent. Excluding this often volatile category, orders were up 0.8 percent in June, the best showing outside of transportation in 10 months. Here’s how to repair and patch damaged drywall Comments   Share   The 0.9 percent gain for non-defense capital goods orders excluding aircraft, the category used as a proxy for investment, followed a decline of 0.4 percent in May.Orders for machinery were up 1.4 percent, while demand for computers and related products shot up 9.1 percent.Copyright © The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. New Valley school lets students pick career-path academies Sponsored Stories Mesa family survives lightning strike to home Top holiday drink recipeslast_img read more

by Kristin M Hall The Associated Press Poste

first_img by Kristin M. Hall, The Associated Press Posted Oct 17, 2018 4:29 am PDT Last Updated Oct 17, 2018 at 5:00 am PDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Marty Mar, left, and Fern, right, of the Social Club Misfits, accept the Rap/Hip Hop Recorded Song of the Year during the Dove Awards on Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey) NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Christian artist Tauren Wells won four awards including new artist and contemporary Christian artist of the year at the 49th annual Gospel Music Association’s Dove Awards.Wells, who was the former lead singer for Christian rock group Royal Tailor, performed “Known” from his solo debut album, “Hills and Valleys,” during Thursday’s award show from Lipscomb University in Nashville, Tennessee.Wells also won awards for pop/contemporary album of the year and also got an award for being a featured artist on the rap/hip hop recorded song of the year with Social Club Misfits.Wells accepted new artist of the year slightly out of breath, explaining that he had been backstage changing clothes when the award was announced and rushed to get to the stage without even knowing what award he had won.“I am so grateful – what award is this?” Wells said. “New artist of the year?! Woah!”Backstage after the show, Wells said that “Known” was about one of the God’s lessons for him about image.“While it’s great to pose for all these pictures and getting to hold all these trophies, this doesn’t matter as much as what is happening inside our hearts,” Wells said.Cory Asbury, a worship pastor in Kalamazoo, Michigan, rode the success of his No. 1 Christian single “Reckless Love” to three awards for song of the year, worship song of the year and worship album of the year. He said the song has connected to a lot of people through church services and on the radio.“I’ve been hearing crazy testimonies of people that say ‘I was suicidal and I was going to take my own life, and I heard this song and I felt the love of God for the first time,’” Asbury said. “Stories like that are why any of us do this.”Songwriter Colby Wedgeworth also won three awards, including songwriter of the year, non-artist, for working with Wells on the “Hills and Valleys” record and for co-writing the pop/contemporary recorded song of the year, “Old Church Choir.”Zach Williams won artist of the year and pop/contemporary recorded song of the year for his song “Old Church Choir,” and Tasha Cobb Leonard won gospel artist of the year and urban worship album.Rap duo Social Club Misfits from Florida won rap/hip hop recorded song of the year for their song “War Cry,” a song they wrote after the high school shooting in Parkland, Florida.“We feel like anything that happens to our generation, we take it personally, so this song came from a place of just wanting to rally a generation,” said Martin Lorenzo Santiago, who goes by the stage name Marty, in the duo.The show featured a couple of cross genre collaborations, including pop singer Tori Kelly singing with Kirk Franklin and country group Rascal Flatts singing with Jason Crabb. The show will air October 21 on TBN.__Online:Homecenter_img Tauren Wells wins 4, including new artist, at Dove Awardslast_img read more

Torrential rain filling reservoirs but public pays a price

first_imgTorrential rain across the island on Tuesday and Wednesday has caused short-term havoc but is filling the reservoirs with much needed water.By Wednesday night, the reservoirs reached record levels for Cyprus, as they stood at 40.5 per cent full, compared with a little over 31 per cent on Tuesday morning.“We expect them to soon reach 50 per cent,” Phaedros Roussos from the water development department said. “The last time we had so much rain in a day was 30 years ago, in 1989.”Four reservoirs overflowed in Paphos, in addition to the Klirou reservoir in Nicosia.By 5pm, three reservoirs in the Paphos district had overflown: the Mavrokolympos reservoir with water capacity 2.18 million cubic metres, the Argaka reservoir which can hold 990,000 cubic metres of water, and the Pomos reservoir which can hold 860,000 cubic metres of water.Later on Wednesday, the Arminou reservoir with a capacity of 4.3 million cubic metres of water overflowed, with the village’s mayor Andreas Petrou noting that the reservoir has not overflowed since 2012.In the coming days, the Ayia Marina Chrysochous reservoir, as well as the massive Germasogeia reservoir in Limassol which can hold 13.5 million cubic metres of water, are expected to overflow.Despite the influx of water into Cyprus’ reservoirs, the Nicosia and Larnaca water boards warned of possible water cuts after heavy sea storms damaged their desalination plants leaving them out of order and with very low stocks of desalinated water.Despite the good news about the reservoirs, the heavy rain came with a price, causing power cuts, overflowing rivers, flooded dwellings, and other damage to property.Roads turned into rivers across the island. The Pedieos river in Nicosia overflowed, causing a number of roads to close at various heights of the river.The Xeros and Dhiarizos rivers also overflowed in Paphos, damaging dozens of roads and properties.Heavy rain and hail were severely restricting visibility on the Limassol to Paphos motorway on Wednesday afternoon.The fire service reported over 80 calls for assistance across the island during the night and more than 20 during the day, including fallen trees and flooded dwellings. No serious injuries were reported.Most incidents were reported in Limassol, which was buffeted by strong winds overnight. Fire service spokesman Andreas Kettis said crews responded to 37 calls, 13 concerning fallen trees on public roads. In some cases, the trees landed on cars causing damage but no injuries.Seventeen other incidents concerned flooded dwellings while six drivers stranded in flooded roads had to be rescued, Kettis said.Fire service crews also removed metal sheets lifted from a roof by the gusts.Electricity company (EAC) crews were working throughout the night to restore power to areas affected by cuts as a result of the weather.In Limassol, EAC said there were 10 cases, including two where the electricity poles ended up in ravines during rock slides. A transformer was also removed by the wind and thrown in a ravine.EAC spokeswoman Christina Papadopoulou asked the public to be patient as crews were working under difficult conditions to restore service.The Limassol district administration had 30 crews out on Wednesday cleaning roads from fallen trees, rocks, and mud. Municipal crews were also out trying to restore the damage.Schools in Agros, Lemithou, and Kampos remained closed on Wednesday because of the weather conditions.All roads leading to Troodos, from Karvounas, Platres and Prodromos and many others in the other districts were closed.Larnaca and Famagusta were also affected but to a lesser extent.Early on Wednesday, there was a power cut in Aradippou and Kiti.Police have warned drivers to heed the warning sign and urged them not to try to drive through rivers as in many places the water is higher than one metre.On Thursday and Friday, the weather will be mostly clear. Temperatures will gradually rise.On Saturday, some snow might fall on the higher peaks of Troodos.  Water flows over Nata bridge in the Paphos district on Wednesday morning (Susan Griffiths)You May LikePlarium I Vikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 minute and see why everyone is addictedPlarium I Vikings: Free Online GameUndoLivestlyChip And Joanna’s $18M Mansion Is Perfect, But It’s The Backyard Everyone Is Talking AboutLivestlyUndoNovelodgeThe One WD40 Trick Everyone Should Know AboutNovelodgeUndo Three arrested in connection with hotel theftsUndoPensioner dies after crash on Paphos-Polis roadUndoRemand for pair in alleged property fraud (Updated)Undoby Taboolaby Taboolalast_img read more

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