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PV Sindhu hopes to find form at Singapore Open

first_imgPV Sindhu hopes to find form at Singapore OpenPV Sindhu will he hoping to bounce back after a run of poor results which saw her crash out early from tournaments like the All England Championship and the Malaysia Openadvertisement Press Trust of India SingaporeApril 8, 2019UPDATED: April 8, 2019 16:39 IST PV Sindhu lost to Korea’s Sung Ji Hyun at the at the All England Championship and Malaysia Open (AP Photo)HIGHLIGHTSPV Sindhu will play Indonesia’s Lyanny Alessandra Mainaky in the 1st roundSaina Nehwal, seeded sixth, will face Line Hojmark Kjaersfeldt of DenmarkKidambi Srikanth is seeded sixth and will take on a qualifier in the 1st roundOlympic silver medallist PV Sindhu will look to shrug off the disappointment of her recent early exits when she spearheads Indian challenge at the USD 355,000 Singapore Open, starting in Singapore on Tuesday.Sindhu, who had claimed the BWF World Tour Finals in December last year, has looked off colour in the last few weeks.She made a first round exit at the All England Championship and lost in the second round of Malaysia Open, losing to Korea’s Sung Ji Hyun on both occasion.She had entered the semifinals at India Open but went down to He Bingjiao of China despite holding advantage in the first game.With hardly any time to make changes on the game or work on weaknesses considering the back-to-back tournaments in the BWF calender, it will be a challenge for fourth seed Sindhu to get to her best. She begins her campaign against Indonesia’s Lyanny Alessandra Mainaky.Saina Nehwal is the only Indian to claim a title this season with the 29-year-old from Hyderabad securing the crown at the Indonesia Masters following the injury of Carolina Marin of Spain in the finals.She also entered the quarterfinals at the All England Championship after battling through a pancreas infection. However, the Indian needed hospitalisation to treat the problem and had to skip the Swiss Open and India Open to give herself time to recover.She returned to Malaysia Open but went down in the first round after a three-game battle with Thailand’s Pornpawee Chochuwong.The sixth seeded Indian will now have to be careful when she plays a fast-rising Line Hojmark Kjaersfeldt of Denmark in the opening round here.advertisementLast week, Kidambi Srikanth was the best-placed Indian at Kuala Lumpur as he finished at the quarterfinals after losing to Olympic champion Chen Long. The 26-year-old from Guntur had broken a 17 month drought by reaching the finals of a BWF event at India Open.This week, sixth seed Srikanth will continue his quest to break his title jinx when he begins his campaign against a qualifier at BWF World Tour Super 500 event.Among others, HS Prannoy, who regained some form with a quarterfinal finish at India Open, will face France’s Brice Leverdez, while Swiss Open finalist B Sai Praneeth has a tough fight ahead against world no 1 and top seed Japan’s Kento Momota.Sameer Verma, who had a good run in 2018, has shown the spark during his narrow defeats to Denmark’s Viktor Axelsen at All England and China’s world no 2 Shi Yuqi at Malaysia Open.The Indian will hope to find his mental strength that helped him to qualify for the World Tour Finals and finish at the semifinals last year when he begins his campaign against a qualifier.In doubles, mixed pair of Pranaav Jerry Chopra and N Sikki Reddy, women’s pair of Ashwini Ponnappa and Sikki and men’s pair of Manu Attri and B Sumeeth Reddy will look for a good outing.Also Read | Bad times are over: Lin Dan after ending title drought at Malaysia Open 2019For sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Tags :Follow PV SindhuFollow Singapore OpenFollow Saina NehwalFollow Kidambi Srikanth Nextlast_img read more

US hiring grinds to a nearhalt many stop looking for work

US hiring grinds to a near-halt; many stop looking for work by Christopher S. Rugaber And Josh Boak, The Associated Press Posted Jun 3, 2016 6:32 am MDT Last Updated Jun 3, 2016 at 4:00 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email WASHINGTON – U.S. hiring slowed to a near-standstill in May, sowing doubts about the economy’s health and complicating the Federal Reserve’s efforts to raise interest rates.While unemployment slid from 5 per cent to 4.7 per cent, the lowest since November 2007, the rate fell for a troubling reason: Nearly a half-million jobless Americans stopped looking for work and so were no longer counted as unemployed.Employers added just 38,000 jobs in May, the fewest in over five years.Less-educated workers bore the brunt of the hiring slump, with a quarter-million high school dropouts losing their jobs in May. That has perpetuated a long-term trend toward a two-tiered job market, with college-educated adults more likely to be employed and earning steady raises.“The shockingly low payrolls gain in May provides further evidence that the economy is showing clear signs of slowing,” said Laura Rosner, an economist at BNP Paribas.The much-weaker-than-expected figure raised doubts that the Federal Reserve will increase short-term interest rates at its next meeting in mid-June or perhaps even at its subsequent meeting in July. Many analysts had expected an increase by July.On Wall Street, the Dow Jones industrial average closed down 32 points, for a loss of 0.2 per cent.The disappointing report spilled into the presidential race, with Donald Trump referring to it on Twitter as a “terrible jobs report” and a “bombshell.” The figures come just days after President Barack Obama touted his economic record in Elkhart, Indiana.Americans particularly worried about the economy have been more likely to support outsider candidates such as Trump and Democratic Sen. Bernie Sanders.Trump’s support has also come disproportionately from adults without college degrees, and Friday’s report served as a stark reminder that less-educated Americans have continued to lose economic ground even as overall hiring and growth have picked up since the Great Recession.Essentially all of the 7 million jobs added over the past decade belong to workers with at least some college experience. The number of high school graduates with jobs is 3 million lower than 10 years ago.“The high school jobs are gone and they’re not coming back,” said Anthony Carnevale, director of the Georgetown University Center on Education and Workforce. “It’s driven by a fundamental shift from an industrial economy to a post-industrial economy.”Craig Lloyd, 27, has mostly worked part-time jobs in restaurants in Wichita, Kansas, since graduating from high school 10 years ago. Some paid as little as minimum wage, while his most recent position as a sous-chef paid $12 an hour.Three months ago, he started his own business selling burritos out of a friend’s food truck on weekends.His wife is returning to school to get her degree, but he doesn’t plan to do so himself. “I’ve really put off getting a higher education, because of the debt that you can incur,” Lloyd said.The hiring stall could be temporary, economists noted. There have been hiring lulls before in the seven-year recovery.But job gains in March and April were also revised downward on Friday, leaving average monthly hiring at a pace of just 116,000 in the past three months. That’s sharply below last year’s average of nearly 230,000.The share of Americans who are working or searching for jobs — a figure known as the labour force participation rate — fell in May to 62.6 per cent, near a four-decade low.Separately, Lael Brainard, a Fed board member and ally of Chair Janet Yellen, signalled Friday that the Fed should be in no hurry to act, especially after the bleak jobs report.The Fed meets next on June 14-15. Economists now see little chance of a rate increase at that time. The Fed raised the short-term rate last December after holding it at nearly zero for seven years.Fed officials may not keep investors guessing for long: Yellen will speak Monday in a closely watched address that may show how she has interpreted Friday’s report.The May job gain was lowered by the Verizon workers’ strike, which depressed hiring in the telecom sector by 37,000.In addition, manufacturers, construction companies and temporary help agencies all shed jobs. Retailers, hotels and restaurants added jobs, but at a slower pace than in recent months.Employers probably cut back on hiring after the economy grew at just a 0.8 per cent annual rate in the January-March quarter.Yet Friday’s dismal jobs report was a surprise in part because most recent economic reports have been encouraging: Consumer spending surged in April. Home sales and construction have also increased. Sales of new homes reached an eight-year high in April.Most economists expect growth will rebound in the April-June quarter to about a 2.5 per cent annual pace.___Follow Christopher S. Rugaber at http://www.Twitter.com/ChrisRugaber Unemployment rates for most demographic groups fell in May. read more

Helen George Call the Midwife horror stories put me off a natural

first_imgHelen George Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Women are entitled to a planned caesarean on the NHS, after discussion with a midwife or doctor about the risks. However, anecdotally, many women say they encounter hostility from medical professionals who try to talk them out of the idea.George gave birth at Guy’s and St Thomas’s hospital in south-east London. The baby was delivered early because George was suffering from intrahepatic cholestasis, a liver disorder that develops in pregnancy and can be life-threatening for the unborn child.George asked the anaesthetist to take mobile phone pictures of the procedure, including the moment her baby was delivered. The images are “quite graphic, but no different to the images on Call the Midwife”, she said. The 33-year-old actress explained: “I’m not against natural birth, I’m pro whatever you feel is right for you. It’s not because I’m ‘too posh to push’, it’s about what I think my body is capable of. I’m not good with pain. I faint when I stub my toe. Not that a C-section is the easy way out. It’s a major operation…“If men went through labour, I think the majority would choose the pain-free way, but there is a feeling that women should have to feel pain.”Her character had to ‘perform’ a C-section during the 2016 Christmas special. George did her research then “and decided that if I ever got pregnant myself, that’s what I would do. Lots of people were shocked by that decision, but I’ve experienced natural childbirth through the legs of many an actress and I didn’t want to do it myself.”George said people had tried to convince her not to have a C-section, and there is “a lot of shame” attached to the decision. But she urged women to have the confidence to request the procedure.“I think there needs to be a national conversation about how C-sections are all right and they don’t just have to be for emergencies,” she said. Helen George with her partner and Call the Midwife co-star Jack Ashtoncenter_img A star of Call the Midwife elected to give birth via caesarean section after working on the show put her off the idea of a natural birth.Helen George called for a national conversation about C-sections, saying they can be a positive choice for women and should not be restricted to medical emergencies.George plays midwife Trixie Franklin in the BBC period drama and is in a relationship with her co-star, Jack Ashton, who plays Rev Tom Hereward. She gave birth to their daughter, Wren, four months ago in an NHS hospital.“I haven’t spoken about this before but I chose to have a C-section. It coincided with the fact that I had to deliver her early but, even without that, I would have gone for an elective caesarean because of what I’d learnt on Call the Midwife.“Working on Call the Midwife means that lots of people tell you their horror stories about birth,” George told Radio Times. George gave birth to her daughter Wren four months agoCredit:Clara Molden  Helen George with her partner and Call the Midwife co-star Jack AshtonCredit:Jonathan Brady/PAlast_img read more