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first_imgArcata >> Davasyia Hagger scored a game-high 26 points as the Humboldt State men’s basketball team defeated Simpson University 84-74 on Tuesday at Lumberjack Arena.Leading by one point at the half, HSU (3-3 overall, 0-1 California Collegiate Athletic Association) opened the second half on an 11-4 run capped by five-straight points from Tyras Rattler Jr. to take a 50-44 lead.Later in the half, HSU extended its lead to its largest of the game at 19 points on a Jack Kaub 3-pointer with just …last_img read more


first_imgIATA boss Alexandre de Juniac People in regions such as Europe and the Asia-Pacific forgot about their troubles and packed their old kit bags in November as demand for air travel reached its highest point in nine months.Overall demand rose 7.6 per cent compared to the year before and airlines filled more seats and the load factor edged up almost a percentage point to 78.9 per cent, according to figures released Wednesday by the International Air Transport Association.Global international passenger demand for the month rose 8 per cent, while worldwide domestic passenger demand — which tends to vary dramatically between countries — grew by 7.1 per cent.Airlines also filled more seats in all regions.Europeans  took to international travel with gusto as demand increased 8.3 per cent and the annualised traffic growth for the past five months hit 12 per cent. IATA said this suggested the disruption caused by terrorism and political instability had lifted “against a backdrop of a growing Eurozone economy’’. Planes travelling to and from Europe flew fuller with the region’s load factor climbing 1.1 percentage point to 80.8 per cent.It was a  similar story in the Asia-pacific, where international passenger traffic also rose 8.3  per cent compared to the previous year and the load factor rose 0.8 percentage points to 77.4 per cent.“The strong upward trend in demand has slowed recently but it is not clear whether this is a longer-term development or just a brief pause,’’ IATA said.Middle East carriers trumped the field with a 12.2 per cent increase in demand, but load factors were a modest 68.7 per cent and IATA said the region’s seasonally adjusted traffic trend had paused.The slowest growth was in North America, where traffic climbed just 1.5 per cent but the load factor still edged up slightly to 78.7 per cent. “Traffic across the pacific is growing rapidly but North Atlantic demand is moderating,’’ IATA said.Latin America saw a 7.3 per cent rise in November traffic and the biggest climb in load factor for any region: 3.4 percentage points to 82.2 per cent. Africa was up 8.2 per cent with two thirds of seats full on average.IATA director general Alexandre de Juniac said the stronger demand for air travel reflected a pick up in the global economic cycle and predicted this would play an increasing role as the stimulus of low oil prices receded.“Travel has never been more accessible—with great fares, many options and more destinations,’’ he said. “Nevertheless, uncertainty lies ahead. The threat of terrorism, questions over the durability of the economic upswing, rising oil prices and increasing protectionist rhetoric are among the concerns. “The industry has reshaped itself and strengthened its resilience to shocks. We should see another solid year of collective profitability for the airlines in 2017.’’last_img read more


first_imgOnly photos and the blueprints remainI visited Dr. Löf at the house just a few months before his death. He was bright, and we had a long conversation.He gave me the original set of blueprints to the house, and I suspect, sadly, that he recognized that the drawings wouldn’t be needed by the next owners of the property. In the 1970s, the George Löf house was frequently hailed for having the oldest continuously operating active solar heating system in the world. Löf lived in the home until his death in October 2009 at the age of 95. (For more information on George Löf, see my book, The Solar House: Pioneering Sustainable Design, or George Löf: Denver’s Solar Pioneer. A February 1958 magazine article on the George Löf house is available online: “Will Your Next House Get Its Heat from the Sun?”) RELATED ARTICLES Solar Versus Superinsulation: A 30-Year-Old DebateForgotten Pioneers of Energy EfficiencyThe History of Superinsulated Houses in North AmericaShades of Green: the 1970s vs. the Millennial Generation Present at the creationNobody played a more enduring role in the 20th-century solar house movement than George Löf. He was present at the creation, so to speak, having been a student of Hoyt Hottel when Hottel built the first-ever “active” solar thermal house at MIT in 1939. In 1945, Löf built the first active solar air system, a precursor to the system installed in the Denver house. He would remain active in the field for decades, and served a term as president of the International Solar Energy Society. A tear-downPrior to the demolition, the Löf house was in original condition, including the flat-plate solar collectors (air heaters) on the roof. It had hardly been touched since its construction 57 years ago: not even a coat of paint in my estimation. Image #2 (below) shows how the Löf house looked when I visited it in September 2011.At that time (two years after Löf’s death), the house was vacant and for sale. Because of the large size of the lot, the condition of the house, and the (wealthy) neighborhood, it was predictable that the house would be purchased as a tear-down. At that time I contacted the realtor and local preservation groups to make sure that the house’s importance was understood, but obviously to no avail.As I document and discuss in great detail in my book, the Löf house was remarkable for its technical innovation and for the sympathetic relationship between the architects (James Hunter of Boulder, assisted by Tician Papachristou) and the engineer (Löf). The design was celebrated by the New York Times for its heating system and Hunter’s “modern lines.”The rooftop collectors, still in place in 2011 and just barely visible behind plywood screens, produced hot air which could be sent straight to the rooms of the house or to gravel tubes that were used to store the heat. The sympathy between architecture and engineering was expressed most beautifully by Hunter’s decision to place the cardboard tubes near the staircase in the center of the house, visible from the entrance, and to paint them bright red. (And in a wonderfully poetic contrast he formed a concrete chimney from the same type of cardboard tube, and painted the chimney a cool blue.) Here is some sad but not surprising news: the George Löf house — one of the seminal buildings in the history of the solar house and certainly a modernist landmark worthy of protection and preservation — was recently destroyed. I visited the Denver site earlier this year and found a large excavation and a foundation (presumably) for a McMansion.Most of us associate the term “solar house” with the 1973 energy crisis. But the feasibility of solar houses in the 1970s would have been impossible without the earlier exploratory work by pioneers such as George Löf. The house Löf built for himself in Denver, in 1955-56, was a seminal experiment in solar heating, using an innovative system of rooftop collectors, solar-heated air, and gravel storage. It “became a model for emerging solar home heating systems and attracted engineers from around the world,” according to the Wall Street Journal. Anthony Denzer teaches architectural engineering at the University of Wyoming and is the author of The Solar House: Pioneering Sustainable Design.last_img read more


first_imgCreative Commons Licensing Flickr CAI “Best Practices” conference, Nov 2008 – 02 by Ed YourdonBy Robin Allen, MSPH, RDN, LDNPreviously as an Administrative Dietitian working in a major university’s dining services, I implemented “point of service” food item nutrition labeling. The intent was not just to point out calories but to provide complete nutrition information for our consumers that included not only college students but faculty and staff. Everyone loved the nutrition labeling except for those students with eating disorders and their health care providers on campus. Many expressed concern that putting calories on the menu was a “trigger” for people with eating disorders. Menu labeling was indeed a touchy subject! Do we change everything for those few? We had the information online, but most people were not aware or did not take the time to look up the items. I chose to continue the food labeling since most people were very appreciative of the information being provided. I also knew mandatory food labeling was on the horizon and indeed had been implemented in many states. Those poor students with eating disorders were going to face with food labels whether it was at school or throughout their daily lives. Some students I indeed worked with to help them handle the nutrition information and use it appropriately.We also learned a great deal about the foods we were serving. Some foods we had thought would be a “healthier” option was worse than the “non-healthy” food item due to food preparation techniques. Some days there would have been nothing to eat if you were looking for a lower fat, moderate in sodium diet. Menu labeling forced us to take stock and re-examine our menus to ensure were at least offering some healthier alternatives. Our goal was not to make everyone eat “healthy” but to at least provide the option and the information to make healthier food choices. Still, when finals week rolled around, all good intentions went out the window and the consumption of french fries, chicken tenders, and pizza skyrocketed! Stress eating is alive and well during finals week.What are the advantages and disadvantages of menu labeling? The “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act”, passed in 2010 required calorie labeling of menus. The requirement for calorie labeling was done to help stem the obesity epidemic and to help consumers make informed and healthier decisions about foods they eat.Some Advantages:1. May promote healthier choices by providing the public with more information to better understand what they eat.2. Provides consumers a guideline on what is a healthy caloric intake based on an average 1,800-2,000 calorie per day diet.3. Focuses on the prevention of chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, hypertension, and obesity.4. Provides nutrition education by requiring the visible display of calorie information and written information on other nutrients upon request.Some Disadvantages:1. There is an additional cost to restaurants and supermarkets for analyzing their food products to determine calorie information; printing new menus, food boards, displays, etc.2. There is a fear that sales of higher calorie foods will drop, which are frequently the most profitable.3. Consumers are not always aware of what is a “beneficial” food or “empty” calories.4. To analyze menus from scratch is very time-consuming and labor intensive.December 1, 2016, is the compliance date given by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for those restaurants to implement menu labeling. Food service operations covered under this ruling will have to list calorie information for standard menu items on menus and menu boards and a brief statement about suggested daily caloric intake. Nutrient information such as total calories, calories from fat, total fat, saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, sodium, total carbohydrates, fiber, sugars, and protein will have to be made available in writing on request. This FDA rule applies to food service operations that are part of a chain of 20 or more locations, doing business under the same name, and offering the same menu selections.Is the labeling of calories on the menu effective in helping consumers to make healthier or different food choices? One study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics indicated people who use menu calorie labels is associated with purchasing fewer calories. However, there are significant socioeconomic differences among customers who notice and use menu calorie labels. Targeted education programs may be needed to improve the use of menu labeling across all sociodemographic groups. Another study from New York University (NYU), found no significant differences in calories purchased before and after menu labeling was required in New York. Adolescents reported that taste was the most important factor in meal selection. This study was primarily conducted in low-income areas.Does menu labeling lead people to make healthier food choices? Do people even know what the labels mean? Are the labels accurate? How do we help our patients navigate the new menu labeling requirements to make healthier choices? Does putting the calories on the menu cause problems or “trigger” eating disorders?There are many unanswered questions, and this topic is now being studied extensively.Tune into our free webinar on October 20, 11:00 pm ET to get the most up to date information on menu labeling.Resources:Elbel, B,  Gyamfi, J, and Kersh, K. Child and adolescent fast-food choice and the influence of calorie labeling: a natural experiment. International Journal of Obesity (2011) 35, 493–500; doi:10.1038/ijo.2011.4; published online 15 February 2011Green, J E, Brown, AG, Punam O. Sociodemographic Disparities among Fast-Food Restaurant Customers Who Notice and Use Calorie Menu Labels. Jn of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 2015-07-01, Volume 115, Issue 7, Pages 1093-1101.Read more here.FDA on Food LabelsThis post was written by Robin Allen, a member of the Military Families Learning Network (MFLN) Nutrition and Wellness team which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families.  Find out more about the MFLN Nutrition and Wellness concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter and on LinkedIn.last_img read more


first_img Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Now Aesop warned of the dangers of cutting open the goose that lays the golden egg to gain what you want now. By doing so, you destroy the geese—and your future. Wonka tried to warn young Verruca Salt as it pertained to his geese, which he made unavailable to her (and rightly so). She wanted the entire world, and she wanted it now. Verruca, like many others, was unable to delay her gratification.In business, this shows up when one misunderstands means and ends. Let’s start with shareholder value, the idea that a business exists to make shareholders money as its dominant priority. Because the concept starts with shareholders as the end, employees and customers become means. Mistreating the means is the most certain way to destroy your ends. Treating employees and customers as if they exist only to help you produce a profit leads to poor care and feeding of the geese.Flipping this and treating the employees and customers as ends almost ensure shareholders get the returns they seek. As a leader, you want customers to be your end. In making that decision, you have relegated employees to means. Again, this is to abuse the geese which produce the golden eggs. Your customers and clients are going to get a certain experience working with your team. The worse your employee’s experience, the worse your customer’s.Success, financial success more specifically, comes from focusing on things in the right order. Customers and clients are important, but not more important than the people that serve them. Shareholders are important too, but they should be an afterthought. If you get the care and feeding of employees, customers, and the stakeholders right, the return on investment is automatic. It’s when you get the sequence wrong and decide that care and feeding of the wrong parties should come first that things get sideways.last_img read more


first_imgTraditionally, computer vision applications have relied on highly specialized algorithms painstakingly designed for each specific application and use case. This meant that designing for computer vision was hard, and this significantly slowed the adoption of vision-based applications. Additionally, this made new applications very expensive and time consuming.However, there has been a democratization of computer vision. By that we mean it’s becoming much easier to develop computer vision-based algorithms, systems and applications, as well as to deploy these solutions at scale – enabling many more developers and organizations to incorporate vision into their systems.Deep learning is one of the drivers of this trend. Because of the generality of deep learning algorithms, there’s less of a need to develop specialized algorithms. Instead, developer focus can shift to selecting among available algorithms, and then to obtaining the necessary quantities of training data.Deep neural networks (DNNs) have transformed computer vision, delivering superior results on tasks such as recognizing objects, localizing objects within a frame and determining which pixels belong to which object. Even problems previously considered solved with conventional techniques are now finding better solutions using deep learning techniques.As a result, computer vision developers are increasingly adopting deep learning techniques. In the Alliance’s most recent survey, 59% of vision system developers are already using DNNs (an increase from 34% two years ago). Another 28% are planning to use DNNs for visual intelligence in the near future.Another critical factor in simplifying computer vision development and deployment is the rise of cloud computing and much better development tools. For example, rather than spending days or weeks installing and configuring development tools, today engineers can get instant access to pre-configured development environments in the cloud. Likewise, when large amounts of compute power are required to train or validate a neural network algorithm, this compute power can be quickly and economically obtained in the cloud.Cloud computing offers an easy path for initial deployment of many vision-based systems, even in cases where ultimately developers will switch to edge-based computing to reduce costs. Our most recent survey found that 75% of respondents using deep neural networks for visual understanding in their products deploy those neural networks at the edge, while 42% use the cloud. These figures total to more than 100% because some survey respondents use both approaches.The world of practical computer vision is changing very fast – opening up many exciting technical and business opportunities. You can learn about the latest developments in computer vision at the Embedded Vision Summit, May 20-23, 2019, in Santa Clara, California. The event attracts a global audience of more than one thousand people who are developing and using computer vision technology. — Jeff Bier is the founder if the Embedded Vision Alliance. >> This article was originally published on our sister site, EE Times: “Tools, Algorithms Drive Embedded Vision.” For more articles related to embedded vision, see: – Embedded vision builds on specialized co-processors – Open-source software meets broad needs of robot-vision developers – Computer vision for the masses: bringing computer vision to the open web platform Can be deployed at low cost and with low power consumption Is usable by non-specialists Since we started the Embedded Vision Alliance in 2011, there has been an unprecedented growth in investment, innovation, and use of practical vision technology across a broad range of markets. To help understand technology choices and trends, the Embedded Vision Alliance conducts an annual survey of product developers.In the most recent iteration of this survey, completed in November 2018, 93% of respondents reported that they expect an increase in their organization’s vision-related activity over the coming year (61% expect a large increase). This increase would not be possible without extensive work on new algorithms and development tools to speed adoption of vision-based systems.Three fundamental factors are driving the proliferation of visual perception. It increasingly Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInMoreRedditTumblrPinterestWhatsAppSkypePocketTelegram center_img Leave a Reply Cancel reply You must Register or Login to post a comment. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed. Continue Reading Previous Syslogic: rugged computers and HMI systems for construction machineryNext How smart sensors enhance ADAS designs Works well enough for diverse, real-world applicationslast_img read more


first_imgChelsea boss Lampard pleased with 2-goal Batshuayi: We need himby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea boss Frank Lampard was pleased with striker Michy Batshuayi for his two goals in their Carabao Cup win over Grimsby.The Blues ran out 7-1 winners to set up a round of 16 tie with Manchester United.Lampard said, “He has worked hard and trained well. He came on at Wolves and made an impact, came on against Liverpool and nearly made an impact and that is great for me when you give a message and someone shows they can train daily and improve there. “Michy has talent, he can hold the ball up and use both feet and can score goals, and he is important for us. He got his chance and scored goals tonight which is good because we need options up front.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more


On Friday, an arbitrator overturned the indefinite suspension of former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, who violently assaulted his then-fiancee (now wife) in an elevator in February. The arbitrator found that NFL commissioner Roger Goodell was not misled by Rice when Goodell initially suspended Rice for two games, and that Goodell’s decision to extend Rice’s ban — following enormous public outcry after the release of a more graphic video of the incident — was “arbitrary.”The ruling means Rice is free to sign with any NFL team, and reports Sunday were that at least four teams were interested. Ethically, there’s no escaping Rice’s scandal and the probable uproar his signing would bring to whichever team takes a chance on him. But there’s also the question of whether Rice is even worth having on the field.From 2009 to 2012, Rice was arguably the best running back in football. But in 2013, he was horrific, ranking last in yards per rush among RBs with at least 200 carries. In fact, restricting the comparison to his contemporaries actually understates how bad Rice was a year ago; among all historical NFL running back seasons of 200 or more carries, only five saw a lower yards-per-carry average than Rice’s 3.08 mark in 2013.Yards per carry isn’t everything, of course. It can be highly volatile from year to year (or even within the same season), overly responsive to a handful of anomalous long runs and not representative of the fact that, when they run the ball, coaches are trying to maximize “success rate” — the rate at which a play increases the team’s expected points — not yards per play.But Rice also had the league’s worst success rate among running backs with 200 or more carries in 2013. And spearheaded by Rice, the Ravens’ rushing offense was the least efficient in football. Furthermore, Pro Football Focus’s play-by-play grading metrics, which measure how well a player fulfilled his responsibilities on a given play, rated Rice as the worst halfback in the NFL a season ago — not only because he was the worst rusher (by far), but also because he was the league’s fifth-worst blocker at the position. (It doesn’t help Rice that his replacement on the Ravens, Justin Forsett, is averaging 5.6 yards per carry and already has 349 more rushing yards this season than Rice had in 2013 — on 35 fewer carries.)So, by any standard, Rice was awful when he last played. And at age 27, he’s at the point on the running back aging curve where production starts to fall off a cliff. FiveThirtyEight contributor Chase Stuart looked at a cohort of recent RBs who had good careers (at least 5,000 career rushing yards and 40 rushing yards per game) and found that nearly a third of them were washed up by the end of their age 28 season. Almost two-thirds were finished by age 29.Even after his reinstatement (and the requisite quotes about Rice having stayed in “great shape” during the ban), Rice is unlikely to contribute to a team in any meaningful way this season. So whoever signs him is looking at maybe two more seasons of any productivity from him — and that’s without factoring in a year of rust and just how bad Rice was when he last took the field. Combined with the seemingly inevitable backlash his signing will cause, it’s tough to find any logical reason to give Rice another chance in the NFL. read more


OSU redshirt junior safety Tyvis Powell celebrates the Buckeyes’ 44-28 win in the Fiesta Bowl on Jan. 1. Credit: Lantern File PhotoAfter having a league record 12 players drafted in the first four rounds of the 2016 NFL draft, the depth of former Ohio State Buckeyes in the NFL does not stop there. With the release of the 53-man rosters, 40 former Buckeyes have secured spots with NFL teams for the 2016 season, including 14 members from the class of 2016.Undrafted free agents Jalin Marshall and Tyvis Powell were the biggest question marks throughout training camps concerning former Buckeyes making rosters. However, both Marshall and Powell made the final roster cuts for the New York Jets and Seattle Seahawks, respectively.Leading the 2016 Ohio State draft class, Joey Bosa and Ezekiel Elliott are expected to step in and make a large impact for the San Diego Chargers and Dallas Cowboys, respectively. Cardale Jones made Buffalo Bills’ roster after throwing for 362 yards and one touchdown in three games of the preseason.Third-round pick of the Houston Texans, Braxton Miller, hopes to inject the offense with instant playmaking ability, similar to what he did in his final year at OSU. Miller will be competing for playing time with a number of young receivers that Houston has been able to gather through the past few drafts.Former quarterback turned receiver for the Cleveland Browns, Terrelle Pryor, has been able to find a good relationship with his new teammate Robert Griffin III after having a limited role last year. Marshall will be joined in New York by 2015 alumnus, Devin Smith, who missed the end of last season after a torn ACL in week 14. Smith will be eligible to play post-week six after opening camp on the Physically Unable to Perform list.The NFL season opens on Thursday, Sept. 8, when the Carolina Panthers play the Denver Broncos. Six former Buckeyes will play in that game. read more


For a majority of the Ohio State football team, one thought comes to mind when they think of Saturday’s upcoming game against Nebraska: “We owe them one.” Some OSU players threw that phrase around after the team’s Wednesday practice at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center. First-year OSU coach Urban Meyer wasn’t part of the Buckeyes’ 34-27 loss in Lincoln, Neb., last season, but he understands his players want revenge. “I have heard them talk about this,” Meyer said Wednesday. “I’ve actually heard, I haven’t brought it up – maybe this weekend or Friday, I’ve got to evaluate where we’re at – but I hear them saying ‘We owe this team.’” Under the lights OSU will have quite the stage for revenge Saturday, with the game being a nationally televised broadcast on ABC, under the lights, with kickoff scheduled for 8:00 p.m. That should help the No. 12-ranked Buckeyes’ chances against the No. 21-ranked Cornhuskers, as Ohio Stadium should be closer to being the “inferno” Meyer has said many times he hopes The Horseshoe can be. Preparing for a night game can pose challenges, though. Players have much more time than usual waiting for kickoff, and what OSU will do Saturday morning and afternoon is something Meyer is still considering. “We’re still finalizing our plans for it. The good thing is, we have a lot of experience with night games, (OSU strength coach Mickey Marotti) and I,” Meyer said. “We want them rested. We have an idea but it hasn’t been completed yet.” Injury update OSU will be without at least one of their playmakers Saturday. Senior running back Jordan Hall will not play in Saturday’s contest as he is still recovering from an injury to his right knee. Buckeye redshirt junior safety C.J Barnett is a “maybe.” “Is there a maybe category? He’s got to get a lot better. He’s still limping around,” Meyer said. Sophomore defensive end Michael Bennett will play after suffering a groin injury before the Buckeyes’ game against Miami. Deep threat Twice this season, and once last year, OSU sophomore quarterback Braxton Miller and sophomore wide receiver Devin Smith have hooked up for a long, game-winning touchdown through the air. Throwing deep is something Meyer said he would like to do more often. He now trusts both Miller and Smith to make connections on long passes, but he wasn’t able to say that in the spring. “If you were to say that before Spring Game – April 21 or something – if you said that April 14 I would have looked at you like you had seven heads. (Smith) has earned that right,” Meyer said of Smith running deep patterns. Defending Nebraska The Huskers don’t have a big, bruising running back like the Buckeyes had to defend last week in Michigan State junior tailback Le’Veon Bell. Many of Nebraska’s players, both offensive and defensive, are of the quicker and leaner build. Don’t say Nebraska isn’t physical, though. “No, no, no. This is a tough outfit. It’s a very physical defense. They fly around. A much different scheme, they try to push you east-west,” Meyer said. Against MSU, the Buckeyes had to focus on mainly just one player – Bell. Nebraska has three capable runners: redshirt junior quarterback Taylor Martinez, senior running back Rex Burkhead and sophomore tailback Ameer Abdullah. Meaning the OSU defense doesn’t have much room for error. “You miss (Martinez) and it’s a home run. That Burkhead just keeps coming at you, coming at you. Their offensive line, I think their offensive line is very good. They block several players as well as anyone I’ve seen,” Meyer said. read more