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first_imgDOUBLE DUTY—Manasseh Garner of Brashear finds a hole in the Westinghouse defense. Garner scored two touchdowns for the Bulls and was also called on to play quarterback after starter Henri Chatman injured his ankle in the first quarter. Perry (3-2) was a part of the four-way tie of first place in the City League that also included its opponent on Friday, Oliver (4-1). They did not prevail as the Bears had one of their best defensive showings of the season, winning a 12-6 thriller at Cupples Stadium. “I had to answer a question to myself in the fourth quarter,” Oliver coach Tim Keefer said. “Do I want to be aggressive playing defense, or do I want to play it safe? We decided to be aggressive.” Their aggression was on display whenever Perry had a final drive in which they had advanced to the Oliver 25-yard line in an attempt to win in the last minutes of the game. Perry’s quarterback Greg McGhee was sacked twice in six plays and hurried once. This led to a final heave to the end zone with 27 seconds remaining that was incomplete and sealed the victory for Oliver.“The next step is getting our kids to do their parts in the classroom,” said Keefer. “We want to keep our kids striving so that they can (stay out here on the field).”The winning points for Oliver were scored in the third quarter whenever quarterback Dante Jeter flipped the ball to Martise Smith who then fired it to David Marshall for the 10-yard score. They also scored on a 60- yard fumble recovery by Ed Mathis late in the second quarter.Perry jumped out to a 6-0 lead in the first quarter when Richard Lowry scored on a 10- yard run. He finished with 27 carries for 117 yards. The Perry offense had 181 yards total offense—123 more than Oliver.OTHER GAMESBrashear 17, Westinghouse 0Brashear (4-1) kept Westinghouse winless as they stayed in a first place tie with Schenley. Manasseh Garner scored on a 1-yard run in the first quarter. He added on another 5-yarder in the third quarter.Brashear’s kicker Cody Magliocca hit a rare (for the City League) 19-yard field goal, also in the third quarter, which helped his team get past the Bulldogs.Peabody 16, Allderdice 0This game was scoreless into the final quarter until Peabody scored on an 81-yard pass from Ronell Moses to Shannon Binion on a fake punt. They added an 18-yard touchdown run by Daniel Burrell with the game winding down.Allderdice’s losing streak extends to 20 games (0-5 on the season). They were held to only 30 yards total offense in the game.This Saturday, Peabody (3-2) will take on Schenley (4-1) in its Homecoming game at 12 p.m. at Cupples Stadium as the Highlanders continue to take part in the post-season.last_img read more


first_imgThe golf season may be in the rearview mirror, but before the weather turned frightful players took to Granite Pointe to participate in the City of Nelson Tournament.The tournament was a fundraiser for the Angelo Mastorbuno Bursary, handed out yearly to a student at L.V. Rogers High School in Nelson.Mallard’s Source for sports would like to salute the players, and the organizing commmittee with Team of the Week honours. The tournament was a hit with the players and goes onto honouring the City of Nelson worker.last_img read more


first_imgFinn Harps captain Kevin McHugh with Mark Farren at a fundraiser.Former Derry City striker and Greencastle native Mark Farren has returned from Mexico after undergoing four-weeks of intensive treatment.The footballing community rallied to Farren’s cause when it emerged an operation he had to remove a tumour had been unsuccessful.It meant Farren had to raise £30,000 to undergo revolutionary treatment in Mexico to try and save his life. The response from all over Ireland and beyond was overwhelming and over £40,000 was raised to enable Mark to go to a specialist clinic in Tijuana in Northern Mexico.Farren was accompanied by his wife Terri-Louise and had gruelling treatment on the grade four brain tumour.However, it is not yet known if the treatment has been a success or not as it is too early to tell.They won’t know until they return to Mexico which they plan on doing at either the end of August or at the start of September. His wife Terri-Louise has said the treatment has left Farren exhausted but has thanked everyone for the messages of support and everybody is praying the treatment will be a success.STRICKEN SOCCER STAR MARK FARREN BACK FROM MEXICO AFTER INTENSIVE TREATMENT was last modified: July 24th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Mark FarrenMexiconewssoccerSporttreatmentlast_img read more


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Friday’s bean rally may be attributed to the Brazilian Central Bank propping up their currency, which will likely slow farmer selling there in the short-term. Also, dry weather in Australia is helping support wheat prices. With both beans and wheat prices higher, corn also increased. U.S. farmers aren’t selling going into harvest, which is supportive. Soybeans and corn both closed technically strong, with potential for more upside next week. However, fundamentally it may be difficult, now that harvest is in full swing.The Chinese visited the U.S. this week and announced they would buy 500 million bushels of soybeans. The announcement was not a surprise to many in the trade as the Chinese consume 60% of the world’s soybeans. The contract details were a bit vague though. The bushels purchased have no guaranteed time frame and no letters of credit have been established. It was a great photo opportunity for all involved, but follow through with commitments will still be needed over the next several months.Corn yield reports are wide-ranging. It seems yields are higher than estimated in areas where conditions were good, but below estimates where conditions were poor. As harvest moves north, I expect corn yields to improve. Early estimates indicate the national yield could be lower than previously estimated, which would support prices. However, harvest has only begun in much of the Corn Belt. We are 30% done harvesting on our farm in Nebraska. Dryland corn is 35 bushels above APH yields (similar to last year) and irrigated is near normal (which was expected). Moisture levels ranging 14%-19%.Early bean harvest results are great north of I-90. Some are suggesting the national yield could be increased. However, as the harvest moves southward, the areas in the south where stands look questionable may not produce as well.What should a farmer do with grain in a commercial facility?I am a big advocate of 100% on-farm storage because of the flexibility and profit potential options. It’s difficult for farmers to optimize their grain marketing strategy to its highest profit potential without it. But, many farmers don’t have 100% on-farm storage. Often these farmers ask me what crop should be stored at home versus commercial storage. There isn’t a one-size fits all formula, because each farmer has their own unique situation. Farmers need to understand all the costs associated to make that decision.Here is an example of a common scenario: a farmer may only have 50% home storage capacity with operating loans on most of the crop and little grain priced for 2015.Keeping grain in commercial storage costs money. Not only monthly storage rates, but finance costs too. Finance costs need to be considered because farmers could just sell all their grain after harvest to pay off all the expenses of raising a crop. Farmers need to be aware of all the costs they face holding grain once its put into storage. How do I calculate those costs?First, farmers need to calculate the operating loan cost by multiplying the interest rate to the grain’s cash value at harvest. Let’s assume 5% interest on the average operation loan and today’s cash prices of nearly $4 corn and $8.75 soybeans:– Corn = 1.6 cents/bushel/month($4 cash value x 5% interest = 20 cents for an entire year / 12 months = 1.6 cents per month)– Soybeans = 3.6 cents/bushel/month($8.75 cash value x 5% interest = 43.75 cents for the entire year / 12 months = 3.6 cents per month) Second, farmers need to calculate the cost to store grain at a commercial facility. Typically it is around 5 cents/month. This means that storing grain costs about 6.6 cents for corn or 8.6 cents for soybeans per month in a commercial facility.But, the price of grain could explode if yields come up shortObviously this is a very common thought among farmers judging by how little of this year’s crop is already sold. Most farmers don’t realize that the futures price potential is actually irrelevant to grain storage decisions. When the cost of storage at a commercial facility is factored, neither crop makes good financial sense to hold. It would be better if farmers sold the grain for cash value and then rebought the grain “on paper” using futures. Why would farmers want to do this?If a farmer sells the grain for the cash value right away, it frees up money that can be used to pay down operating notes and reduces their cost per month significantly by eliminating storage fees and interest charges. Farmers could then buy back the grain with futures, waiting for the futures price they are hoping to get. How does this work?To buy back the grain using futures, the CBOT requires about 40 cents per bushel to be placed in the farmer’s account (i.e. margin). Typically, I suggest clients have an additional $1 per bushel more in their hedge account to cover any additional margin call. This would eliminate any margin calls unless the price dips below $3 for corn and $7.75 for soybeans. (This $1 per bushel extra is not required upfront, it’s whatever the farmer is comfortable with doing as long as they understand they could be responsible for more margin requirements.) Remember, you just sold your grain for cash ($4 for your corn or $8.75 for your soybeans), so the $1.40 per bushel amount should be easily covered, plus you will get this money back when you finally sell the futures. The loan expense equivalent on this amount would only be .6 cents per month ($1.40 at 5% = 7 cents per year or .6 cents per month). This is far less than the 6.6-8.6 cents per month to store the grain. Doing this, the farmer still has unlimited price risk, just as they did when they left it unpriced in the bin. What about basis appreciation?There is no guarantee the location the farmer delivers grain to at harvest will have the best basis later in the marketing year. Variances from rail shutter loader locations to ethanol or soy crush plants are wide-ranging making basis bids uncertain from location to location throughout the marketing year.While I have seen basis for both corn and beans to rally 6.6-8.6 cents/month, it has not been that common. Basically, owning grain on paper versus storing it in a commercial facility eliminates risk and improves cash flow.Most farmers don’t realize that they have the same risk using a futures account as they do to storing unpriced grain in a commercial facility. So while the basis could improve, the cost of storage and interest of the operating note will likely make the risk to store commercially unpriced grain too high.Sadly many farmers either don’t know how or don’t use all the tools available to them that would make their farm operations more profitable with less risk.Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results. He can be contacted at jon@superiorfeed.com.last_img read more


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest When I got up this morning, the rain had started to fall and it is obvious we will be out of the fields for the next few days. Last week we made tremendous progress on the fall harvest. We were able to cut soybeans seven days in a row and we only have 10% of the soybeans left to harvest. We were able to shell some corn the week before and we are very pleased with the yield performance we are seeing.The soybeans yields have been very erratic. Our productive soils have performed at normal or above normal levels and the poorer soils have been a disappointment. The yield differences are a result of the replanting we had to do in June. The replanted soybean yields have been variable and the May-planted beans have been about normal. It is not a surprise that when you plant in June, conditions need to be ideal to achieve normal crop yields. We are also seeing the results of crop stress this year, which explains some of the variations in yield. We had severe water damage in early July and some areas did not recover from that. We are seeing it now on the yield monitor.The corn crop is doing great. It has been a very pleasant surprise so far. Our average harvest moisture has been 20.5%. We have been very pleased with that, but what we have harvested has all been April-planted corn.The weather has been absolutely wonderful and perfect for drying down the late-planted corn. We had concerns a month ago about whether the crop would make it to full physiological maturity but that concern has been eliminated and it will be at near normal harvest moisture levels.If it does frost in the coming week it will be alright. Back in late August and September, early frost was a huge concern. I didn’t think the corn would make it but with the warm temperatures it has been ideal for the development of that late-planted corn and yields won’t be affected as much as I thought they could be.The standability of the corn is going to be on a field-by-field case. Some of the April-planted corn definitely needs to be harvested but the later-planted corn stalk integrity is still intact and not a concern.last_img read more


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Evin Bachelor, Law Fellow, Agricultural and Resource Law Program, Ohio State UniversityThe Ohio General Assembly has returned from the midterm elections with a potentially busy lame duck session ahead of it. Already a number of bills that we have been monitoring have seen activity in their respective committees.The Ohio Senate Agriculture Committee held first hearing on multi-parcel auction bill. State senators heard testimony on House Bill 480 on Nov. 13. The bill would authorize the Ohio Department of Agriculture to regulate multi-parcel auctions, which are currently not specifically addressed in the Ohio Revised Code. The bill also defines “multi-parcel auction,” saying such an auction is one involving real or personal property in which multiple parcels or lots are offered for sale in part or in whole. The bill would also establish certain advertising requirements. The bill’s primary sponsor, Representative Brian Hill of Zanesville, says that he introduced the bill in an effort to recognize by statute what auctioneers are already doing, and to do so without interrupting the industry. The bill passed the Ohio House of Representatives 93-0 in June.last_img read more


first_imgSuspected militants shot dead two policemen, one of them the guard of Hurriyat leader Fazul Haq Qureshi, in Kashmir on Sunday. Their service weapons were also snatched.A police official said Farooq Ahmad was “grievously injured” when unknown gunmen fired upon him “as he was performing the duties of guarding Qureshi” in Bilal Colony at Soura of Srinagar on Sunday evening. “The injured policeman was shifted in a critical condition to a hospital where he succumbed to his injuries,” said a police official.Earlier, a policeman guarding the Chrar-e-Sharief shrine in Budgam was fired upon by militants. Constable Kultair Singh, who is from Samba, died in hospital.last_img read more


first_imgOver the next four  years Touch Football Australia (TFA) will have numerous representative teams competing in various international events. The cycle will culminate in the 2015 World Cup being hosted in New South Wales, Australia. Leading up to 2015 Australia will compete on the international stage annually at various events in various divisions. TFA is therefore seeking expressions of interest (EOI) from suitably qualified, currently accredited and active coaches to fill a number of coaching positions. For full information please see the attached doucment. Related Files2011_tfa_hp_coaching_advertisement-pdflast_img read more


first_imgJaylon Smith helped off the field by trainers.Jaylon Smith Injury Jaylon Smith InjuryJaylon Smith InjuryFew players had a worse NFL Combine than Notre Dame’s Jaylon Smith, through no fault of his own. Smith was failed by multiple teams on his physical due to potential nerve damage stemming from the significant knee injury he suffered against Ohio State, which included a torn ACL and LCL.Smith, once viewed as a potential top 10 draft pick, will probably fall out of the first round altogether, but he’s doing whatever he can to prove that he is healing up. In an interview with Yahoo Sports, he revealed that he is currently leg pressing over 600 pounds, and squatting over 400.Can Smith feel a tangible difference physically in the past five weeks?“Oh yeah, absolutely,” Smith said. “A few weeks have made a huge difference, even the past two weeks. I can feel it.“Rehab is going great. I am leg-pressing over 600 pounds right now. I am squatting over 400 pounds. I am getting that strength back. It’s just a matter of time.”Asked whether it has been determined if he suffered nerve in the injury, Smith was a bit vague, but he remained upbeat.“We’ll see when I go back there [to the medical recheck],” Smith said. “We’ll see what the doctors say then. I feel like I’ve regained some of it. I’m happy where I am at right now.”When healthy, Smith is an incredibly impressive prospect. Hopefully he finds a team that will take a chance on him.[Yahoo Sports]More: Vote In Our “Most Annoying People In Sports Media” Championship >>>last_img read more


first_img13Jun Rep. LaFave: Plan expanding internship options to high school students signed into law State Rep. Beau LaFave today announced his plan helping high school students earn course credit through an internship or work study program has been signed into law.“Education today goes well beyond what’s in the classroom, especially as our children grow older and advance through high school,” LaFave said. “The real-world experience that an internship can provide is important to our job providers and students, helping identify what the future may hold for both. We’ve got to encourage these kinds of opportunities to explore if a certain career track is a strong fit or not before earning a high school diploma.”The legislation sets guidelines stating that students can work four to 10 hours a week and, with the local district board of education’s oversight, will receive credit for graduation. The internship may be paid or volunteer. Partner legislation also safeguards funding for school districts, allowing students participating in an internship or a work experience program off campus to continue to qualify as a full-time student.Although current Michigan Department of Education guidelines allow work-based internships in grades 9-12, LaFave’s new law makes it less prohibitive for students and school districts, especially in Delta, Dickinson and Menominee counties.“There are several major corporations in Michigan that have facilitated internships to both high school and college students, which is great to see. However, my legislation opens the door to smaller local businesses and the mom and pop’s like we have in the Upper Peninsula, not just billion dollar companies,” said LaFave, of Iron Mountain. “Hands-on experience is at a premium in today’s workplace. Expanding more authority to local school districts to decide on appropriate programs, while cutting through the red tape, will help both the students and the local job creators.”LaFave noted he had letters of support on the plan from the Gladstone, Carney-Nadeau and Breitung Township school districts. Also supporting the legislation are the Michigan Department of Education, Michigan Association of School Boards and the Great Lakes Education Project.House Bill 4106 is now Public Act 184 of 2018.##### Categories: LaFave News,Newslast_img read more